2016 County Production Figures In;

PCG Area Produced 5.1 Million Upland Bales

Friday, May 12, 2017                              By Mary Jane Buerkle

      The 2016 Texas High Plains cotton crop certainly is one for the record books, as several factors, including excellent subsoil moisture at planting, hot weather at opportune times, and rains that proved more timely than first thought combined to help growers produce more than 5.1 million bales of cotton, the fourth-largest crop in PCG history.

      This is an increase from the 3.8 million 480-pound bales produced during the 2015 growing season and about 73,000 bales more than the 5.045 million bales projected by NASS in their January 2017 report for Districts 1-N and 1-S.

      Planted acreage in 2016 was up almost 560,000 acres from the previous year, totaling about 3.67 million acres. Most of that increase was in the northern portions of the PCG service area, where growers almost doubled cotton acreage from 2015 to 2016. Producers regionwide brought more than 90 percent of that to harvest at about 3.3 million acres, an abandonment rate of about 9 percent.

      According to the final county level production estimates released on Wednesday by NASS, the Plains Cotton Growers 41-county service area accounted for almost two-thirds of the 8.1 million bales of upland cotton produced in Texas this past season. Statewide production was up almost 42 percent from 2015, and the average yield per acre statewide was up almost 23 percent from last year at 748 pounds per acre.

      On a national basis, Texas growers accounted for almost half of the 16.6 million upland bales produced in the United States in 2016, easily maintaining their position as the No. 1 cotton producing state in the nation. Georgia was second with 2.18 million bales, and Mississippi was third with just more than 1 million bales. In 2016, 10 of the top 11 cotton-producing counties in the nation were within 80 miles of Lubbock, again reinforcing the area's claim as the nation's largest cotton patch.

      A complete rundown of 2016 crop statistics for planted and harvested acreage, yield per harvested acre and total bales produced in PCG's 41-county service area is included in the table that accompanies this article.

      Lubbock County was the top-producing county on the High Plains and in the nation in 2016, with a whopping 479,300 480-pound bales of cotton and averaging 903 pounds per harvested acre. Lynn County was second with 416,900 bales, and Hockley third at 414,000. Overall yield per harvested acre on the High Plains averaged 741 pounds in 2016, up from 633 in 2015.

      Joining Lubbock, Lynn and Hockley counties in the top ten cotton-producing counties in the High Plains Region (reported in 480-lb bales) were: Dawson, 339,600; Floyd, 333,600; Gaines, 318,800; Hale, also at 318,800; Crosby, 298,800; Terry, 285,900; and Lamb, 221,900. Jackson County, Okla., ranked tenth in the nation with 226,500 bales.

      As for yield, Sherman County ranked at the top for 2016, averaging 1,318 pounds per harvested acre. Individual counties ranking second and third in yield per harvested acre were Hutchinson County (1,193 pounds), and Moore County (1,182 pounds).

      A complete listing of the 2016 upland cotton production totals for Texas and other states is available on the NASS website (http://www.nass.usda.gov). Just click on the "Quick Stats" link to search for the data you want to find.

2016-crop Upland Cotton Production

Plains Cotton Growers, Inc. 41-County Service Area

County

Planted

Harvested

Yield per

Production

(Acres)

(Acres)

Harv. Acre

(Bales)

Andrews

Armstrong

6,600

6,300

891

11,700

Bailey

71,000

60,700

760

96,100

Borden

39,300

38,600

414

33,300

Briscoe

31,600

25,200

869

45,600

Carson

64,000

51,700

1,115

120,100

Castro

39,000

33,480

965

67,300

Cochran

131,700

118,600

664

164,000

Crosby

203,500

198,800

721

298,800

Dallam

Dawson

310,000

286,200

570

339,600

Deaf Smith

17,600

15,900

954

31,600

Dickens

29,200

28,700

808

48,300

Floyd

185,900

174,400

918

333,600

Gaines

285,000

255,100

600

318,800

Garza

43,000

42,900

693

61,900

Hale

216,100

169,700

902

318,800

Hansford

Hartley

Hemphill

Hockley

268,000

253,900

783

414,000

Howard

135,700

124,240

450

116,500

Hutchinson

14,000

11,710

1,193

29,100

Lamb

158,700

116,700

913

221,900

Lipscomb

Lubbock

262,000

254,800

903

479,300

Lynn

321,100

317,600

630

416,900

Martin

175,400

140,100

507

148,100

Midland

Moore

24,600

23,630

1,182

58,200

Motley

20,900

19,900

656

27,200

Ochiltree

22,900

19,420

1,043

42,200

Oldham

Parmer

32,100

23,410

1,044

50,900

Potter

Randall

6,600

5,030

1,126

11,800

Roberts

Sherman

20,000

19,230

1,318

52,800

Swisher

88,700

84,100

1,029

180,300

Terry

242,000

228,900

600

285,900

Yoakum

119,800

99,000

667

137,500

1-N Combined Co.

51,300

45,590

1,270

120,600

1-S Combined Co.

37,300

28,660

744

44,400

High Plains Total

3,674,600

3,322,200

741

5,127,100

(weighted)

Source: National Agricultural Statistics Service
= Zero Production or production aggregated into Combined Counties

 

Connect With PCG!

 

Find us on Facebook and Twitter

http://www.facebook.com/plainscottongrowers

http://www.twitter.com/PCGNews

 

Subscribe to PCG Email Services!

http://ow.ly/gp7KZ

 

Bangladeshi Textile Executives Visit U.S. With

COTTON USA Special Trade Mission

May 2017        Information from Cotton Council International

       Textile executives from 12 Bangladeshi companies got a closer look at COTTON USA and learned more about why U.S. cotton is the world's preferred fiber when they traveled across the U.S. Cotton Belt on April 30-May 6. They also participated in multiple meetings with U.S. cotton exporters for the purpose of increasing the export of U.S. cotton to these manufacturers.

      Cotton Council International (CCI), the National Cotton Council's export promotions arm, conducted this COTTON USA Bangladesh Special Trade Mission.

      Bangladesh stands as U.S. cotton's ninth largest market - with U.S. export commitments there at more than half a million bales thus far in the 2016-17 marketing year which ends on July 31. The individual companies participating in this trade mission are expected to consume about 705,000 bales in 2016-17, about 11 percent of Bangladesh's total cotton consumption.

      CCI President Eduardo L. (Eddy) Esteve, a Dallas, Texas merchant, said, "Bangladesh imports more cotton than any other country and only three other countries' textile mills use more cotton.

      We want to reinforce the fact to these trade mission participants that U.S. cotton is of superior quality and is the world's preferred fiber. We also want to remind these important U.S. cotton customers that we are committed to delivering our fiber to them in a very timely manner."

      The Bangladeshi delegation began its tour in New York with a CCI briefing and an ICE Futures seminar. They saw cotton research in North Carolina and toured the USDA cotton classing office in Bartlett, Tenn., and visited a cotton farm and gin in Lubbock, Texas.

      The group also met with exporters in the Cotton Belt's four major regions and with these industry organizations: AMCOT, American Cotton Producers, American Cotton Shippers Association, Cotton Incorporated, Lubbock Cotton Exchange, National Cotton Council, Plains Cotton Growers, Inc., Southern Cotton Growers Association, Texas Cotton Association, Western Cotton Shippers Association and Supima.

 

Want the facts about the U.S. agriculture and farm policy?

http://www.farmpolicyfacts.org

 

Our View: It's Called a Farm Bill For a Reason

Friday, May 12, 2017                           From Farm Policy Facts

      Celebrity chefs are much ado about the farm bill these days making the rounds on Capitol Hill, according to a recent story in The Washington Post. As a side note, we wish The Washington Post and other news outlets would cover farmers when they are visiting their Congressional representatives.

      The chefs' first order of business is to hold a march in Washington for food. "We had the Million Woman March, we had the Million Man March. How many people could we get out there marching for food," Andrew Zimmern of the show Bizarre Foods is quoted as saying.

      After the march, the next order of business is changing the name of the farm bill.

      "We need to work on renaming the Farm Bill the Food Bill, because that's what it is," explained Andrew Zimmern. "It's about what we do every day with food."

      While these efforts may be well intentioned - the farm bill is, in fact, about ensuring a stable and sustainable supply of food and fiber - they are certainly divorced from the challenges and risks farm families face, as well as the challenge of feeding a growing world population, the vast majority of whom could never afford the delicacies these chefs create.

      The absurdity prompted agricultural reporter, Chris Clayton, to tweet, "Guys who charge $25 for appetizers and $50-plus main courses want to rescue the food supply for the rest of us."

      Truth.

      This is always a difficult conundrum, but former House Agriculture Chairman Larry Combest once summed it up this way: "if we have plenty of corn and wheat and basic crops, then we can all worry about our many wants. These are wonderful problems to have. Just keep in mind that if we get it wrong with respect to the basic crops, then we will all be consumed with one very big problem — the basic problem of how to sustain ourselves."

      This happy talk about a march for food and a food bill is happening while farmers are facing one of the worst declines in recent history. Our food supply remains robust, diverse, and incredibly affordable - at least in grocery stores, but right now the conversation around kitchen tables of farm families all across the nation concerns being able to sustain their businesses.

      It is key to point out that these chefs - spearheaded by Tom Colicchio - work in concert with the Environmental Working Group (EWG) - an organization that is dedicated to decimating the very farm policy and risk management tools that allow farmers to survive such economic downturns. They actively worked against passing the last farm bill and their subsidiary group called Food Policy Action scores members of Congress negatively if they vote for measures that actually support farmers.

      We refer to the law dictating agricultural policy in this country as a "farm bill" for a reason. Without farms, there is no food. Without farms, there is no fiber. Without farms, efforts to protect our land, water, and air would be greatly diminished. Without farms, there is no security. And, one that these chefs can understand, without farms, there are no restaurants.

      Efforts to keep farmers farming during dark days while the rest of us casually go about our affairs are why a farm bill exists. We call it a farm bill for a reason. It all starts on the farm.