2013 County Production Figures In;

PCG Area Produced 2.44 Million Upland Bales

Friday, May 9, 2014                             By Mary Jane Buerkle

      The 2013 crop is officially in the books, statistics-wise, as the National Agricultural Statistics Service issued final 2013-crop production figures showing that High Plains growers produced about 2.44 million bales of cotton last year, a decrease from the 2.93 million 480-pound bales produced during the 2012 growing season and more than 220,000 bales less than the 2.67 million bales projected by NASS in their January 2014 report.

      Planted acreage in 2013 was down again from the previous year, totaling just more than 3.76 million acres. Unfortunately, producers brought less than half of that to harvest at 1.68 million acres, which wasn't much more than the 1.54 million acres High Plains producers reported harvesting two crops ago in 2011, when the abandonment rate hit a record high at 66 percent. The abandonment rate from initial plantings in 2013 was 55 percent, and 44 percent in 2012.

      According to the final county level production estimates released today by NASS, the Plains Cotton Growers 41-county service area accounted for almost 59 percent of the 4.1 million bales of upland cotton produced in Texas last season. Statewide production was down 17 percent from 2012, although statewide average yield per acre, at 646 pounds, was up 23 pounds from last year.

      On a national basis, Texas growers accounted for almost 34 percent of the 12.2 million upland bales produced in the United States in 2013, maintaining their position as the No. 1 cotton producing state in the nation. Georgia was second with 2.3 million bales.

      A complete rundown of 2013 crop statistics for planted and harvested acreage, yield per harvested acre and total bales produced in PCG's 41-county service area is included in the table that accompanies this article.

      Floyd County barely edged Crosby County to be the top-producing county on the High Plains, with 228,900 480-pound bales of cotton and averaging 898 pounds per harvested acre. Overall yield per harvested acre on the High Plains averaged 694 pounds in 2013, up from 603 in 2011.

      Joining Floyd County in the top ten cotton-producing counties in the High Plains Region (reported in 480-lb bales) were: Crosby, 228,600; Hockley, 211,600; Lubbock, 195,300; Lynn, 188,200; Hale, 176,400; Gaines, 174,200; Terry, 152,100; Lamb, 116,500; and Yoakum, 102,200.

      As for yield, Hutchinson County retained their title from 2012 as the top-yielding county for 2013, producing 1,285 pounds per harvested acre. Ranking second and third in yield per harvested acre were Moore County (1,200 pounds), and Hartley County (1,191 pounds). Castro and Parmer rounded out the top five High Plains counties.

      A complete listing of the 2013 upland cotton production totals for Texas and other states is available on the NASS website (http://www.nass.usda.gov). Just click on the "Quick Stats" link to search for the data you want to find.

 

2013-crop Upland Cotton Production

Plains Cotton Growers, Inc. 41-County Service Area

County

Planted
(Acres)

Harvested
(Acres)

Yield per

Harv. Acre

Production
(Bales)

Andrews

Armstrong

Bailey

88,200

26,800

645

36,000

Borden

44,800

13,400

329

9,180

Briscoe

43,200

12,000

920

23,000

Carson

38,100

31,200

835

54,300

Castro

32,900

19,400

995

40,200

Cochran

140,100

52,300

596

64,900

Crosby

223,000

177,900

617

228,600

Dallam

Dawson

329,400

47,000

879

86,100

Deaf Smith

16,100

6,300

670

8,800

Dickens

31,000

28,600

436

26,000

Floyd

182,000

122,300

898

228,900

Gaines

314,000

123,200

679

174,200

Garza

47,500

37,000

568

43,800

Hale

194,800

96,600

877

176,400

Hansford

Hartley

3,800

2,700

1,191

6,700

Hemphill

Hockley

275,000

145,300

699

211,600

Howard

143,300

42,500

347

30,700

Hutchinson

4,300

3,100

1,285

8,300

Lamb

170,100

79,700

702

116,500

Lipscomb

Lubbock

283,500

119,200

786

195,300

Lynn

339,500

172,400

524

188,200

Martin

203,100

18,200

654

24,800

Midland

Moore

11,500

8,000

1,200

20,000

Motley

32,400

24,400

382

19,400

Ochiltree

6,900

6,300

777

10,200

Oldham

Parmer

32,000

12,400

983

25,400

Potter

Randall

Roberts

Sherman

Swisher

82,400

39,700

896

74,100

Terry

253,300

115,200

634

152,100

Yoakum

130,600

74,600

658

102,200

1-N Comb. Co. *

26,000

15,500

982

31,700

1-S Comb. Co. *

46,500

14,900

709

22,000

 

3,769,300

1,688,100

694

(weighted)

2,439,580

Source: National Agricultural Statistics Service
= Zero Production or production aggregated into Combined Counties

 

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Key Buyers to See U.S. Cotton's Advantages

Friday, May 9, 2014           From the National Cotton Council

      Key textile executives from 12 Indonesian companies will tour the U.S. Cotton Belt May 11-17 to get a close look at U.S. cotton production, processing and marketing and to meet with U.S. exporters.

      Indonesia is the fifth largest importer of U.S. cotton and U.S. export commitments to that country are 639,000 bales in the 2013-14 marketing year. The 12 companies represented on this trade mission collectively are expected to consume about 1.1 million bales of which about 406,000 bales, or 37 percent, will be U.S. cotton.

      This COTTON USA Special Trade Mission is conducted by Cotton Council International (CCI), the National Cotton Council's export promotions arm.

      CCI President Jordan Lea, a South Carolina merchant, said, "Yarn spinning is migrating from China to other Southeast Asian markets and one of those is Indonesia. Indonesian spinners will become an even more important U.S. cotton industry partner in the future."

      Lea said the tour will offer an excellent opportunity to solidify relationships with these textile manufacturers and enhance future U.S. cotton purchases. He said that will be accomplished by educating these important U.S. cotton customers about U.S. cotton's advantages and by bringing them face-to-face with U.S. cotton exporters.

      The 16-member Indonesian delegation will begin its tour in New York with a CCI briefing and an ICE Futures seminar. They will see cotton research in North Carolina, tour the USDA cotton classing office in Bartlett, Tenn., and visit a farm in California's San Joaquin Valley. (PCG EDITOR'S NOTE: The group will be in Lubbock on May 14 and 15.)

      The group also will meet with exporters in the Cotton Belt's four major regions and with these industry organizations:  the NCC, American Cotton Producers, Cotton Incorporated, American Cotton Shippers Association, Southern Cotton Growers Association, Texas Cotton Association, Plains Cotton Growers, Lubbock Cotton Exchange, AMCOT, Western Cotton Shippers Association and Supima.

 

TALL XIII Visits Brazil

Friday, May 9, 2014                             By Mary Jane Buerkle

      The 13th class of the Texas Agricultural Lifetime Leadership program completed their seminars with an international trip to Brazil April 24-May 7.

      The two-year program, led by the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service and directed by Dr. Jim Mazurkiewicz, is an intensive study of agriculture worldwide which equips people in the agriculture industry to become leaders in their fields. The course focuses on international communications, ecology, government, policy, economics, social issues and education opportunities. The 26 participants, 13 of whom are from West Texas, have visited all regions of the state as well as Washington D.C., Maryland, New York, California and now Brazil.

      During the group's 12 days in Brazil, they spent time in Rio de Janeiro, the state of Mato Grosso, and in the countryside near Sao Paulo. They saw cotton, corn and soybean farms, a yarn spinning mill, a sugarcane operation, and even a latex farm. The group visited the AGRISHOW, one of the largest agricultural shows in the world, and the EXPOZEBU Brazilian cattle show. They also toured Minerva Foods and the Agrindus Milk Farm, and visited the Cotton Institute of Mato Grosso State and the Center for Advanced Studies on Applied Economics. The last day, the group visited the JBS corporate headquarters and the U.S. Consulate, both in Sao Paulo.

      "It was eye-opening to travel to a whole other continent and to see a culture and a new frontier of agriculture," said class member Eric Wanjura with Farmers Cooperative Compress in Lubbock and Plainview. "I think it's interesting that Brazil is developing their farmland on a much larger scale – 10,000 to 20,000 acres at a time with only a single farm headquarters and housing for managers any employees – than the United States, where we developed quarter-sections of land for a homestead to support one family, and have grown from there."

      Wanjura said the two-year program has been extremely beneficial for him.

      "TALL has broadened my horizons from my experience in the cotton industry and specifically relating to co-ops," he said. "I've increased my knowledge base over all aspects of agriculture within the state and even the nation, with our travels to both the east coast and the west coast. In addition, the networking opportunities have been tremendous, not only with the speakers, organizations and representatives we've encountered over the past two years, but also with individual classmates, who are all experts in their own right in different areas of ag throughout the state."

      TALL XIII members from the High Plains include Jason Avent, Avent Land Management, Canyon; Kody Bessent, High Plains Water District, Lubbock; Mary Jane Buerkle, Plains Cotton Growers, Lubbock; Bryan Clift, Clift Land Brokers, Amarillo; Casey Cook, Great Plains Ag Credit, Amarillo; Shelley Heinrich, Heinrich Brothers Farms, Lubbock; Heath Hill, Thoreson Farms, Gruver; Lindsay Kennedy, National Sorghum Producers, Lubbock; Kelly Kettner, Kelly & Deborah Kettner Farm, Muleshoe; Wade King, Underwood Law Firm, Amarillo; Brady Miller, Texas Cattle Feeders Association, Amarillo; Joe Osterkamp, Stonegate Farms, Muleshoe; and Eric Wanjura, Farmers Cooperative Compress, Lubbock/Plainview.

      Class members from the rest of the state include Debra Barrett, Linda Galayda, Brandon Grooms, Sally Oglesby Harris, Brant Mettler, Jon Mixson, Kevin Proctor, Jeremy Seiger, Mark Slavens, Kelley Sullivan, Matt Tyler, Chase Tyndell, and Jesse Womack.

      For more information about TALL, see http://tall.tamu.edu.