Crop Loss Program Deadlines Approaching

      Area growers who planted cotton with Monsanto Genuity or Bayer CropScience cotton traits on irrigated acreage and are planning to submit claims under the Monsanto or Bayer CropScience Crop Loss programs should be reminded that the deadline for submitting those claims is Friday, August 31.

      To qualify for the Monsanto program, the grower must experience crop loss within 60 days of planting, and the crop must be destroyed. If those criteria are met, the grower may qualify for a 100% technology fee refund. The crop loss program only applies for cotton with Genuity cotton traits.

      To qualify for the Bayer program, the grower's crop must be lost, destroyed and unable to be replanted prior to August 31 due to an eligible cause of loss under the Multiple Peril Crop Insurance Program. If a grower's eligible cotton crop is damaged, as described under general program requirements, to the extent that it qualifies for crop loss, then Bayer CropScience will reimburse the grower for his invoiced price of seed and LibertyLink and/or GlyTol technologies, less $150/bag.

      An authorized representative, authorized retailer or seed supplier where the purchase originated, or an approved designee, must inspect and verify the loss. A claim report must be filed for each claim.

      Growers with certified dryland acreage may submit claims under the Monsanto or Bayer CropScience Drought Relief programs, but deadlines for those are not until January 2013.

 

Football Season is HERE!

Celebrate Cotton with Texas Tech!

Saturday, September 15

Texas Tech vs. University of New Mexico

6 p.m. – Jones AT&T Stadium

 

SPECIAL TICKET PRICE of $20 with promo code

COTTON2012

 

Online: http://bit.ly/CelebrateCotton

Phone: (806) 742-4412 or (888) GO-BIG12

Mention the promo code COTTON2012

 

Find out more about the game at http://www.plainscotton.org/CelebrateCotton.html

 

 

Students Graduate from

Texas International Cotton School

      Twenty-four students from across the United States and from five countries around the world graduated from the Texas International Cotton School, held August 6-17 at the Fiber and Biopolymer Research Institute of Texas Tech University. The school, held annually in Lubbock, is now in its 24th year. Since its inception in 1989, there have been a total of 537 students from 59 countries in the world and 16 states in the United States.

      The school is a collaboration between the Texas cotton merchants who make up the Lubbock Cotton Exchange and FBRI faculty and staff. The intensive program allows students the opportunity to learn about cotton from field to fabric, taught by 32 experts from across the United States. Topics include seed breeding, farm production, harvesting, ginning, warehousing, merchandising, and textile manufacturing. Multimedia classroom teaching is augmented by use of the multiple laboratories at the Institute and by visits throughout the cotton industry infrastructure that is clustered around Lubbock.

      All aspects of U.S. and global trade of cotton are covered, so the students obtain an understanding of what is required to successfully participate in the U.S. cotton market and to deliver the cottons needed in a diverse U.S. and export market. They learn about the important quality attributes of cotton fibers and how these translate into processing efficiency and textile product quality. Students also have the opportunity to interact with members of the Lubbock Cotton Exchange and others in the agribusiness community at social events.

      Josh Underwood, current president of the Lubbock Cotton Exchange, is pleased with both the quantity and quality of this year's school.

      "The enrollment of 24 students makes this one of the largest classes on record, while the quality of instruction provided by the array of industry and scientific experts was excellent," Underwood said. "The school provides a great environment for raising the students' awareness and understanding of Texas cotton and how it serves the needs of global textile markets. Its value to the Texas cotton industry is revealed by the strong support given the school by the entire merchant community in Texas."

      Graduates include Nacer Aounallah, TTU; Kimberly Bamonte, Parkdale Mills, North Carolina; Stephen Coffman, TTU; Gary Cross, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension; William Frame, Virginia Tech University; Maheshika Herath, TTU; Caitlin Jackson, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension; Rana Jhagra, Adam Traders International, Pakistan; Charlie Langdon, Dynamic Green Concepts/TTU, Lubbock; Shanshan Li, TTU, China; Zhuanzhuan Ma, TTU, China; Tyler Painter, TTU; Deborah Pitrone, ECOM-USA, Dallas; Alejandro Plastina, International Cotton Advisory Committee, Washington, DC; Xing Qi, TTU, China; Gary Roschetzky, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension; Bruna Santana, TTU, Brazil; Curtis Schaefer, TTU; Bablu Sharma, TTU, India; Jonathan Shockey, TTU; Usman Sohail, Habib Cotton, Pakistan; Takayuki Takayama, Marusan Industry Co. LTD, Japan; Corey Thompson, TTU; and Ravindra Thota, Software Associates, Inc., Maryland.

      For more information on the Texas International Cotton School, visit http://www.texasintlcottonschool.com.

 

 

Area Field Days Scheduled

      Mark your calendars for the following area field days:

      Sept. 4 – Texas Tech/Texas AgriLife Research Field Day, 8 a.m., Quaker Farm, 400 N. Quaker

      Sept. 12-13 – Deltapine Retailer Trainings, Lorenzo

      Sept. 14 – Deltapine Field Day, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., Levelland/Brownfield (exact location TBD)

      Sept. 18 – Deltapine Field Day, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., Steve Chapman Farm, Lorenzo

      Sept. 19 – Deltapine Field Day, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., Deltapine Facility in Aiken/Floyd County

      Sept. 20 – Deltapine Field Day, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., Nichols Farm, Gaines County

      Sept. 24 – Deltapine Field Day, 4 p.m., Doug Jost Farm in St. Lawrence

      Sept. 25 – Deltapine Field Day, 10 a.m.-1 p.m., AGCARES in Lamesa

      For more information on the Deltapine field days, call Eric Best at (806) 790-4646.

      If you have a field day you would like to add to this schedule, please call Mary Jane Buerkle at (806) 792-4904 or email maryjane@plainscotton.org.

 

Want the facts about the U.S. agriculture and farm policy?

http://www.farmpolicyfacts.org

 

NRCS to Host Local Work Group Meetings

      The USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service and the Soil and Water Conservation Districts will host Local Work Group meetings in August and September. The purpose of the public meetings is to receive input from farmers, ranchers, local agencies, organizations, local agricultural leaders, businesses, and other individuals that have an interest in natural resource concerns.

      Area meetings coming up this week are as follows:

      August 21 – 7:30 a.m., KNT Cafˇ, 123 Commercial Street (Highway 60), Miami

      August 21 – 10 a.m., Armstrong County Activity Building, Highway 207 South, Claude

      August 21 – 2:30 p.m., USDA Service Center, 1301 South Main, Seminole

      August 23 – 9:30 a.m., Vega Banking Center, 101 Main Street, Vega

      For more information, contact the local USDA-NRCS office in your county, listed under USDA in the Yellow Pages, or access the information on the Texas NRCS website at http://www.tx.nrcs.usda.gov.

 

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West Texas Agricultural Chemicals Institute

Annual Conference Set for September 6

      The annual meeting of the West Texas Agricultural Chemicals Institute has been scheduled for Thursday, Sept. 6, at the Scottish Rite Temple - Learning Center, located at 1101 70th Street in Lubbock, (South Loop 289 and Interstate 27).

      This year represents the 60th meeting of WTACI, an unincorporated organization of dealers, industry representatives, agricultural producers, scientists, educators, and agribusiness members who support education and research programs promoting safe and effective use of agricultural chemicals and protection and preservation of the area's natural resources.

      Topics to be discussed at the conference include various aspects of pest identification and management, pesticide application and disposal, research efforts on row crops in the High Plains, and much more.

      The Texas Department of Agriculture (TDA) has approved a total of 6.5 continuing education units (CEU's) in the areas of IPM (1.0), Pesticide Laws and Regs (1.0), Drift Minimization (1.0) and General (3.5). In addition, the WTACI program has been approved for 4.0, 2.0 and 0.5 hours of Pest Management, Crop Management and Professional Development, respectively. A detailed list of presentations and speakers will be available shortly.

      Pre-registration currently is available online at http://wtaci.tamu.edu/onlineregistration.php. Registration forms have been mailed. On-line registration fees are $75 for conference attendees and $300 for a booth and must be completed or postmarked by August 31. On-site registration will begin at 7:00 the day of the conference and will cost $95 for attendees and $325 for booth sponsors. Lunch will be provided as part of the registration fee.

      Opportunities also exist to contribute to the WTACI Scholarship Fund, which has provided more than $60,000 in scholarships to students majoring in agricultural fields at many Texas universities.

      Contact Jason Woodward at 806-632-0762 or jewoodward@ag.tamu.edu for questions about the program and CEU's. If you have trouble or questions regarding registration contact David Pointer, 806-746-4021 or dlpointer@ag.tamu.edu