Tx AgriLife Extension Updates Insect & Disease
Control Information In FOCUS Special Edition

Lubbock, April 8, 2011                              By Shawn Wade

      Texas AgriLife Extension personnel from the Texas A&M University Research and Extension Center at Lubbock have published a special edition of the "Focus on South Plains Agriculture" newsletter highlighting management and crop protection options for growers coping with the abrupt loss of the insecticide/nematicide Temik¨ last month.

      The special edition newsletter, titled Farming Cotton Without Temik¨, details available options for growers and focuses on two of the primary pests that Temik¨ has been used to control - western flower thrips and root-knot nematodes.

      Noting that Temik¨ has been a mainstay for Texas High Plains growers for 40 years, Texas AgriLife Extension Entomologist Dr. David Kerns and Extension Plant Pathologist Dr. Jason Woodward worked closely to compile and provide growers the best information on the limited options available for control of both thrips and root-knot nematodes in cotton.

      The newsletter provides valuable information on potential insecticide/nematicide alternatives delivered in-furrow, through soil fumigation, as seed treatments, or applied as foliar treatments. Also included is information about the role variety selection and crop rotation can play in minimizing yield impacts and helping to control nematode populations longer term.

      To view this FOCUS special edition on the web go to: http://lubbock.tamu.edu/focus/

      For additional information about nematode sampling procedures and cotton variety disease and nematode resistance ratings do not forget about the publications Nematode sampling instructions for cotton producers on the Southern High Plains of Texas and Response of cotton varieties to diseases on the Southern High Plains of Texas, 2010. Both publications are available from the "What's New" section of the Lubbock center's home page (http://lubbock.tamu.edu) or via the Plains Cotton Growers website at: http://www.plainscotton.org

 

Ag Logic LLC Submits Application For New
Permanent Registration Of An Aldicarb Product

Lubbock, April 8, 2011                              By Roger Haldenby

      It has already been well reported that recent legal actions filed against Bayer CropScience resulted in closure of the plant that manufactures a key raw material used to produce Temik¨. This has meant a permanent halt in Temik¨ production, with no further availability of the product other than meager inventory in some dealer/distributors or in some grower barns.

      However, there is a ray of hope for the future.

      A company named "Ag Logic LLC" is seeking to obtain a new permanent registration of an aldicarb product. The Environmental Protection Agency has announced that Ag Logic LLC has submitted an application to register the active ingredient aldicarb as a 15% pesticide in cotton, dry beans, peanuts, soybeans, and sugar beets. EPA is seeking comment through April 29, 2011.

      The fact that Ag Logic LLC has come forth in an attempt to register an aldicarb product is good news for Texas cotton growers who rely heavily on aldicarb for control of nematodes and thrips. We encourage growers and interested parties to submit supportive comments on the new registration.

      We encourage you to visit the EPA web site and submit your opinion regarding the value of aldicarb to our cotton production system. A link to the Federal Register's comment submission page can be found on the Plains Cotton Growers website at: http://www.plainscotton.org, or you can go straight to the EPA announcement online at:

http://www.federalregister.gov/articles/2011/03/30/2011-6978/pesticide-products-registration-applications

      Submitting comments online is an easy process. You start by clicking the "Submit A Formal Comment" button on the Federal Register web page.

      In addition to the online process, there are also other methods described on the web page that can be used to deliver comments. Remember to include Docket ID: EPA-HQ-OPP-2010-1021 on any comment you submit.

 

PCG Board Elects '11-'12
Officers/Exec. Comm.

Lubbock, April 8, 2011                              By Shawn Wade

      Littlefield, Texas cotton producer Brad Heffington was re-elected President of Plains Cotton Growers, Inc. for 2011-2012 during the organization's quarterly Board of Directors meeting held April 1 in Lubbock.

      Also rejoining Heffington as PCG officers are Slaton, Texas cotton producer Craig Heinrich, re-elected Vice President, and Lamesa-area cotton producer Shawn Holladay who was re-elected Secretary-Treasurer of the 41-county cotton producer organization.

      In other business conducted April 1, the PCG Board selected members to serve on the organization's 2011-2012 Executive Committee. Each year the PCG Board elects a total of nine directors, three from each of the organization's three sub-regions, to serve alongside the organization's three elected officers and two most recent past presidents.

      Members of the 2011-2012 PCG Executive Committee are: District 1 representatives - Johnie Reed of Kress, James Brown of Muleshoe and Dan B. Smith of Lockney; District 2 representatives - Stacy Smith of Wilson, Scott Harmon of Idalou, and David Carter of Levelland; District 3 representatives - Wesley Butchee of Seagraves, Al Spinks of Midland and Eddy Herm of Ackerly; President Brad Heffington of Littlefield, Vice President Craig Heinrich of Slaton, Secretary-Treasurer Shawn Holladay of Lamesa, Board Chairman Barry Evans of Kress, and past president Mike Hughes of Lamesa.

 

2011 Upland Cotton Loan
Chart Now Available

Friday, April 8, 2011                                  By Shawn Wade

      The United States Department of Agriculture Farm Service Agency released the 2011-crop Upland Cotton Loan Premium and Discount tables late last week and it appears that little has changed from the 2010 tables.

      As was the case the previous year, changes to the 2011 premiums and discounts tables were confined to a very narrow range. In broad terms the best overview of the new tables is simply that higher quality cotton will generally be worth a little bit more while cotton of lower quality will be worth a little less.

      Most of the changes for the 2011 crop were limited to plus or minus 10-15 points in the White grades (11-71) with Staple longer than an inch (32) and plus or minus 25 points for other Color grades Staple 31 and shorter.

      It bears noting that almost all of the changes for cotton Staple length 34 and shorter resulted in larger discounts, although few of the changes were actually greater than 25 points.

      Like the changes applied to the Color/Leaf/Staple combinations, changes in the premiums and discounts for Bark and Extraneous matter, Micronaire, Strength, and Length Uniformity were also minor.

      The most obvious change in this section of the loan table, surprisingly, was the slight improvement in discounts applied to Micronaire readings below 3.5. In fact, the only discounts that increased in the Micronaire table were for the lowest Micronaire group (2.4 and below), which increased by 5 points -940 points, and the highest Micronaire group (5.3 and above), which increased 10 points to -335 points per pound.

      Improvements in the low Micronaire discounts were: Micronaire 3.3-3.4, plus 5 points to -175; Micronaire 3.0-3.2, plus 5 points to -335; Micronaire 2.7-2.9, plus 20 points to -625 points; and, Micronaire 2.5-2.6, plus 5 points to -905 points per pound.

      The table below provides comparisons between 2010 and 2011 loan values for White Grades 11-41 and Light Spot grades 12-42, Staple 33 through 37.

      Complete 2011 Loan Premium and Discount tables and loan charts with calculated values based on the 2011 schedule of premiums and discounts will be posted on the Plains Cotton Growers website at: http://www.plainscotton.org

 

 

COMPARISON OF LOAN PREMIUMS AND DISCOUNTS FOR SELECTED

GRADE, STAPLE LENGTH, AND LEAF CONTENT COMBINATIONS

OF 2011-CROP AMERICAN UPLAND COTTON

Base Loan Rate: U.S.= 52.00 ˘/pound

 

Staple

33

34

35

36

37+

Color

Leaf

2010

2011

Change

2010

2011

Change

2010

2011

Change

2010

2011

Change

2010

2011

Change

 

 

Loan

Loan

 

Loan

Loan

 

Loan

Loan

 

Loan

Loan

 

Loan

Loan

 

SM &

Leaf 1-2

15

20

5

210

210

0

400

410

10

475

485

10

485

500

15

better

3

10

10

0

185

185

0

345

350

5

410

420

10

425

435

10

11 & 21

4

-80

-80

0

110

105

-5

230

235

5

300

295

-5

310

305

-5

 

5

-195

-190

5

-50

-50

0

135

130

-5

190

185

-5

205

200

-5

 

6

-375

-375

0

-305

-300

5

-230

-230

0

-215

-215

0

-205

-205

0

 

7

-525

-525

0

-445

-445

0

-385

-390

-5

-370

-375

-5

-360

-365

-5

MID

Leaf 1-2

10

10

0

170

165

-5

330

340

10

410

420

10

420

430

10

31

3

-5

-5

0

150

150

0

310

315

5

370

375

5

380

385

5

 

4

-115

-115

0

75

75

0

190

190

0

260

255

-5

270

265

-5

 

5

-210

-205

5

-95

-95

0

105

100

-5

150

140

-10

160

150

-10

 

6

-385

-385

0

-320

-315

5

-265

-260

5

-245

-245

0

-235

-235

0

 

7

-530

-535

-5

-450

-450

0

-415

-415

0

-390

-395

-5

-380

-385

-5

SLM

Leaf 1-3

-135

-135

0

45

50

5

135

140

5

170

175

5

175

175

0

41

4

-200

-195

5

Base

Base

Base

85

85

0

125

125

0

130

125

-5

 

5

-290

-290

0

-195

-195

0

-115

-125

-10

-60

-70

-10

-60

-70

-10

 

6

-470

-465

5

-395

-390

5

-355

-350

5

-335

-330

5

-335

-330

5

 

7

-630

-630

0

-565

-565

0

-535

-535

0

-525

-520

5

-520

-520

0

SM &

Leaf 1-2

-45

-45

0

75

75

0

190

185

-5

265

255

-10

275

265

-10

better

3

-60

-60

0

60

60

0

165

160

-5

230

220

-10

240

230

-10

12 & 22

4

-155

-150

5

-10

-10

0

105

110

5

180

175

-5

190

185

-5

 

5

-350

-345

5

-205

-200

5

-130

-130

0

-100

-100

0

-90

-90

0

 

6

-480

-480

0

-405

-405

0

-375

-380

-5

-365

-365

0

-355

-355

0

 

7

-620

-625

-5

-560

-560

0

-535

-530

5

-525

-520

5

-515

-515

0

MID

Leaf 1-2

-125

-120

5

-20

-20

0

40

35

-5

100

95

-5

100

95

-5

32

3

-140

-140

0

-45

-45

0

15

10

-5

90

85

-5

90

85

-5

 

4

-220

-220

0

-145

-140

5

-50

-55

-5

10

5

-5

15

10

-5

 

5

-400

-395

5

-305

-305

0

-255

-255

0

-225

-230

-5

-225

-230

-5

 

6

-545

-545

0

-480

-470

10

-445

-440

5

-430

-425

5

-430

-425

5

 

7

-670

-670

0

-630

-625

5

-605

-600

5

-595

-590

5

-595

-590

5

SLM

Leaf 1-3

-265

-265

0

-170

-165

5

-95

-95

0

-30

-30

0

-30

-30

0

42

4

-285

-280

5

-210

-205

5

-140

-140

0

-85

-90

-5

-85

-90

-5

 

5

-430

-430

0

-370

-360

10

-305

-300

5

-290

-290

0

-290

-290

0

 

6

-595

-595

0

-520

-510

10

-485

-480

5

-470

-465

5

-470

-465

5

 

7

-745

-745

0

-690

-685

5

-655

-650

5

-650

-645

5

-650

-645

5