BIG DECREASES FOR COTTON HIGHLIGHT THE
NOVEMBER CROP PRODUCTION REPORT

 

Friday, November 12, 2010                       By Shawn Wade

      An unusually large reduction in overall yield prospects for the Texas crop paved the way for a significant downward shift in the projected size of the State's 2010 Upland cotton crop earlier this week.

      The changes, which cumulatively reduced Texas production by 600,000 bales to 8.3 million bales, were primarily concentrated in the High and Rolling Plains regions and reflect a growing sentiment among producers, who have harvested approximately 60 percent of their crop since the release of the October Crop Production report, that something was amiss in their fields.

      For many growers the advancing harvest had begun to reveal a chink or two in the 2010 crop's previously pristine armor. With nothing definitive to pin it on though, growers throughout the area had been quietly wondering if they might be the only ones whose fields were yielding slightly less than they had expected based on pre-harvest measures.

      This week's USDA Crop report indicates that these concerns were not isolated and that, overall, the crop was producing less cotton than had originally been estimated by producers and USDA field enumerators.

      With no clear idea what, exactly, is responsible for the decline, it appears that most of the yield revisions were made to account for slightly reduced yield prospects in the region's typically reliable irrigated fields. On a yield per harvested acre basis, the average reductions applied to the High Plains crop in districts 1-N and 1-S were 19 and 66 pounds, respectively,

      On a percentage basis those changes reflect a 1.8 percent pull-back in the expected yield for district 1-N and a higher 8.7 percent pull-back in 1-S yields. While the revisions seem relatively modest at the acre level, multiplying them by the report's 3.6 million harvested acre total amounted to an overall reduction of 420,000 bales. The changes resulted in the High Plains forecast dropping from 6.16 million bales to the November projection of 5.74 million bales.

      High Plains harvested acreage figures remained unchanged in the November report, as is often the case, even though storms that crossed the area in early October should eventually add to the region's abandonment total. Right now abandonment is still only tallied at 160,000 acres, or 4.3 percent of planted acreage. The October storm losses could potentially push that number higher, but probably not until USDA releases final county level totals next Spring.

      Nationally the November report estimated total U.S. Upland production at 17.92 million bales, down 455,000 bales from the October report. Yield reductions in Texas and Oklahoma, totaling 610,000 bales, were partially offset by increases in expected production in Florida, Georgia, Kansas, Mississippi, Missouri, North Carolina and Virginia that totaled 155,000 bales.

      The table below includes district level figures for Texas as reported by the Texas Agricultural Statistics Service and published by USDA NASS.

 

Texas District Estimates 2009 and 2010*

Upland Cotton

Planted Acres

Harvested Acres

Yield per Acre

Production

2009

2010

2009

2010

2009

2010

2009

2010

District

1,000 acres

1,000 acres

pounds

1,000 bales

1 - N

600.0

810.0

501.0

760.0

880

1,036

918.0

1,640.0

1 - S

2,667.0

2,950.0

1,929.0

2,840.0

642

693

2,579.0

4,100.0

2 - N

340.5

375.0

286.0

370.0

594

610

354.0

470.0

2 - S

509.0

515.0

407.0

510.0

369

499

313.0

530.0

4

62.5

110.0

56.7

105.0

477

777

56.3

170.0

7

176.0

200.0

136.2

195.0

579

640

164.2

260.0

8 - N

51.5

55.0

24.2

53.0

712

1,087

35.9

120.0

8 - S

338.0

280.0

16.7

275.0

356

890

12.4

510.0

9

90.5

136.0

77.4

130.0

526

775

84.8

210.0

10 - S

74.7

95.0

23.2

90.0

602

747

29.1

140.0

OtherDist.

90.3

74.0

42.6

72.0

826

1.000

73.3

150.0

State

5,000.0

5,600.0

3,500.0

5,400.0

634

738

4,620.0

8,300.0

Source: National Agricultural Statistics Service;
* = preliminary November 2010

10TH TEXAS COMMODITY SYMPOSIUM PROGRAM
FINALIZED; MARK YOUR CALENDARS FOR DEC. 1

 

Friday, November 5, 2010                         By Shawn Wade

      The tenth annual Texas Commodity Symposium will be held Dec. 1, and is hosted by the Corn Producers of Texas, Plains Cotton Growers, Inc., Texas Grain Sorghum Association, Texas Peanut Producers Board and Texas Wheat Producers Association.

      The Symposium will be held in conjunction with the Amarillo Farm and Ranch Show in the Grand Plaza Room at the Amarillo Civic Center. Registration is free and will begin at 8:30 a.m. and the Symposium will begin at 9 a.m.

      This year's Symposium will conclude with the annual Ag Appreciation luncheon hosted by the Texas Commodity Symposium and the Amarillo Chamber of Commerce Ag Council.

      On the agenda for this year's TCS is an examination of a variety of issues that impact agricultural producers and businesses alike. Featured topics include status of current and future current agricultural policy, the political ramifications of the November elections, Texas State NRCS and FSA updates, and a discussion of the potential economic impact of reduced availability of underground water resources for irrigated agriculture through regulatory action.

      Dr. Darren Hudson, professor and Larry Combest Chair for Agricultural Competitiveness and director of the Cotton Economics Research Institute at Texas Tech University, will address the water scenario and discuss his findings as to what would happen to the economy of Texas cities and towns if farmers were no longer allowed to irrigate their crops.

      On the political front, veteran Washington, DC agriculture correspondent James R. "Jim" Wiesemeyer will discuss what impact the recently held mid-term Congressional elections will have on agricultural policy and on the United States as a whole.

      Wiesemeyer is Senior Vice President of the Washington Bureau of Informa Economics and is considered the dean of Washington agricultural journalists. High Plains cotton growers may best know Wiesemeyer as the author of ProFarmer's "Inside Washington Today" column, which is available by subscription from http://www.profarmer.com.

      Rounding out the 2010 program will be Brandon Willis, Deputy Administrator for Farm Programs, USDA Farm Service Agency from Washington, DC who will discuss the status of the Conservation Reserve Program, FSA's computer modernization initiative and other topics of interest.

      "This is a great opportunity to hear a diverse group of speakers that will address the main issues affecting agriculture on the Texas High Plains," PCG Executive Vice President Steve Verett said.

      For more information, on the program please contact Stephanie Pruitt, CPAT communications director, at (800) 647-CORN (2676).

 

CONSERVATION PROGRAM APPLICATIONS BEING
ACCEPTED AT NRCS OFFICES STATEWIDE

 

November 9, 2010

      Applications for funding opportunities with the USDA's Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) Environmental Quality Incentive Program (EQIP), Conservation Stewardship Program (CSP) and Wildlife Habitat Incentive Program (WHIP) are currently being accepted at all NRCS offices across Texas.

      NRCS in Texas has received its initial allocation of program funding recently and will begin obligating CSP contracts after January 7, and EQIP and WHIP contracts after January 28, 2011.

      EQIP is a "working lands" conservation program that assists private landowners with conservation measures that address priority resource concerns as identified by local farmers and ranchers.

      WHIP is designed to benefit wildlife on primarily wildlife land although agriculturally productive operations may qualify for funding.

      CSP rewards farmers and ranchers for current conservation management and encourages additional practices and enhancements to further benefit the environment and reduce priority resource concerns.

      All of NRCS Farm Bill Programs are voluntary and have a continuous sign-up with periodic ranking cut off periods. NRCS encourages any person interested in participating in their programs to contact their local field office, usually located at the county seat.

      The NRCS administers both programs and provides technical assistance to landowners. 2010 represents the 75th year of NRCS "helping people help the land." Since its inception in 1935, NRCS has advanced a unique partnership with state and local governments and private landowners delivering conservation based on specific, local conservation needs, while accommodating state and national interests.

      For more information on any of these programs, or to find your local NRCS service center visit http://www.tx.nrcs.usda.gov/programs.

 

COTTON QUALITY REPORT

 

      The following is a summary of the cotton classed at the Lubbock and Lamesa USDA Cotton Division Cotton Classing Offices for the 2010 production season.

2010 High Plains Cotton Quality Summary

 

Current Week:

 

Office

Bales

Color

Leaf

Staple

Lamesa

117,566

21+ - 85.3%

31 - 9.9 %

2.22

35.39

Lubbock

367,672

21+ - 82.3%

31 - 8.3%

2.36

36.17

 

Mike

Strength

Uniformity

Bark

Lamesa

4.39

29.75

80.77

7.2%

Lubbock

3.99

30.50

80.68

7.2%

 

 

Season Totals To Date:

 

Office

Bales

Color

Leaf

Staple

Lamesa

415,374

21+ - 81.1%

31 - 13.1%

2.39

35.24

Lubbock

1,381,573

21+ - 86.2%

31 - 8.3%

2.42

35.91

 

Mike

Strength

Uniformity

Bark

Lamesa

4.42

29.49

80.74

8.2%

Lubbock

4.01

30.26

80.64

7.3%

Source: USDA AMS