HIGH PLAINS STORMS BRING HEAVY RAIN, HAIL;
DAMAGE ASSESSMENT STILL UNDERWAY


Friday, October 22, 2010                          By Shawn Wade

      The past five days have been rough for growers in various parts of the High Plains as thunderstorms sweeping through the area generated heavy rainfall and, in some cases, hail.

      Early in the week, a line of storms moved through the area with brief heavy rains and hail. This storms major impact appears to be loosening harvest-ready cotton and allowing it to begin hanging further out of the boll, or stringing out. Fortunately few of the reports from this storm system included tales of cotton being knocked completely out of the boll and left on the ground.

      Yesterday's storms, however, do appear to have caused a more significant level of damage. Rainfall totals on October 21 range from 1-5+ inches in various locations, with scattered hail. How much acreage was impacted by hail is the question producers and ginners are scrambling to answer right now. The epicenter on October 21 appears to be a corridor from northern Yoakum County, Texas, through southern portions of Lubbock County and northwestern Lynn County. This area includes a significant portion of Terry County as well.

      Additionally, there are reports of weather impacting acreage outside of the area to the southwest of Lubbock. Reports indicate additional isolated events also occurred to the north and east of Lubbock in Hale, Floyd and Crosby County and south along the Lubbock/Lynn County line.

      Over the next few days, as fields dry out and the weather clears, lots of effort will be made to estimate how much cotton has been damaged or destroyed by the storms.

      "The thing to remember right now is that it will take time to figure out how much acreage has been significantly impacted by the events of the last few days," explains Steve Verett, Executive Vice President of Plains Cotton Growers, Inc. "Much of the acreage that was bound for harvest in the storm damaged areas is still likely to see a harvester running in them, even though yield and quality may be impacted.

      "For the growers that lost crops completely or lost a significant amount of yield potential as a result of this week's weather there is little that can be done to take the sting out of the loss. As a grower myself, I can attest to the fact that this hurts," concludes Verett.

      The next big question is how this will impact the cotton market, which is trading on a fairly tight set of supply and demand assumptions. Initial damage reports Friday appear to have added another ingredient to the mix and helped push cotton prices higher during the Friday trading session.

      Longer-term market impacts will depend on how much the event alters expectations for upcoming crop production estimates. For the next few weeks it appears that all eyes will sharpen their focus on the High Plains crop and the upcoming November USDA Crop Production report.

 

COTTON QUALITY REPORT

      The following is a summary of the cotton classed at the Lubbock and Lamesa USDA Cotton Division Cotton Classing Offices for the 2010 production season.

2010 High Plains Cotton Quality Summary

 

Current Week:

 

Office

Bales

Color

Leaf

Staple

Lamesa

64,919

21+ - 82.2%

31 - 14.9%

2.41

35.11

Lubbock

255,381

21+ - 93.3%

31 – 4.4%

2.38

35.85

 

Mike

Strength

Uniformity

Bark

Lamesa

4.38

29.16

80.64

6.1%

Lubbock

4.02

30.33

80.72

4.5%

 

 

Season Totals To Date:

 

Office

Bales

Color

Leaf

Staple

Lamesa

102,089

21+ - 79.1%

31 - 19.5%

2.44

35.02

Lubbock

429,755

21+ - 90.0%

31 – 6.7%

2.42

35.63

 

Mike

Strength

Uniformity

Bark

Lamesa

4.36

29.05

80.66

6.3%

Lubbock

4.02

29.91

80.57

4.5%

Source: USDA AMS

 

 

The COTTON USA Advantage

CCI FAX – October 22, 2010

      Sourcing USA Summit speakers examine issues affecting the global cotton and textile industries. The 2010 Sourcing USA Summit, organized by Cotton Council International and Cotton Incorporated, will bring together more than 450 global cotton industry leaders for strategic thinking and networking opportunities. The Summit Business Forums will cover U.S. cotton fiber, the global cotton supply chain and the economic outlook for the cotton market. The audience will be able to give immediate feedback on the current topic of discussion via an electronic voting system. In what's sure to be an exciting debate, a "Bull & Bear" panel of leading trading experts will argue whether different scenarios indicate a bull market vs. a bear market. The Summit will be held Nov. 9-12 at Terranea¨ in Rancho Palos Verdes, CA, near Los Angeles. Additional information can be found on the Summit website (www.sourcingusasummit.com)

 

THE HAND THAT FEEDS U.S.

http://www.thehandthatfeedsus.org/