August Production Estimate Confirms
Record-breaking Potential Of 2010 Cotton Crop

Friday, Lubbock, Texas                              By Shawn Wade

      Usually a big increase in Upland Cotton production from one year to the next would be big news in the cotton industry.

      Yesterday's USDA Crop Production report indicating the potential for a 52 percent increase in U.S. cotton production in 2010 over 2009 levels certainly qualifies as big news.

      Fortunately for cotton producers on the Texas High Plains, who are expected to produce one in every three bales of 2010-crop U.S. cotton, the news was just what the market expected and what many had hoped for. With production issues popping up in key production areas and prospects for improved demand and prices for 2010 cotton, a sizeable, high quality U.S. crop is poised to be a fiercely sought-after growth for textile end-users around the world.

      Taking a closer look at the numbers it appears that growers who opted to switch back into cotton in various parts of the U.S. Cotton Belt made a great decision in 2010 as price and demand forecasts have steadily improved throughout the year while cotton stocks have been dropping worldwide.

      Overall U.S. growers planted about 40 percent more acres in 2010 than they devoted to the crop in 2009. Production prospects on the increased acreage are good in most areas, culminating in the USDA forecast of 18 million bales, 52 percent more cotton than was produced in 2009.

      Texas prospects are among the brightest in the land in 2010 with 5.5 million Upland cotton acres headed for harvest. The early August snapshot from USDA illustrates the record-breaking potential of the Texas crop. According to USDA the state is poised to produce just over 8.8 million bales, 300,000 more than the state's current record production level of 8.48 million bales set in 2005.

      Low abandonment and good yield potential are fueling the August estimates according to Lubbock-based Plains Cotton Growers. Good growing conditions and timely rains over the next 6-8 weeks could still push yield forecasts for a majority of the Texas crop higher.

      Good upside potential is evident in the High Plains region, where growers have abandoned an estimated 135,000 acres out of the 3.78 million acres reported as planted. A good August and September could push overall yield prospects above the currently project 1,050 and 731 pound levels reported by USDA for Texas crop reporting districts 1-N and 1-S, respectively. Record yield levels for these two districts are 1,082 and 819 pounds per acre for Districts 1-N and 1-S, respectively, both of which were set in 2007.

      The current forecast for District 1-N of 1,050 is near the 2007 level, while the District 1-S forecast of 731 pounds is still well below the 819-pound record. It should be noted that many growers in non-irrigated areas indicate the 2010 crop has the potential equal or surpass what they produced in 2007 with the right weather combination.

      As it always is on the Texas High Plains, the key to the 2010 crop will be the weather over the next month and a half. A good August/September with one or two timely rain fall events will make a huge impact on non-irrigated cotton, while the irrigated crop needs the same good weather but won't harbor the same urgency about receiving a rain to finish the crop out.

      With a timely rain and good weather yields could easily rise to match 2007 levels in many areas of the High Plains. Prospects could be dampened just as quickly, however, if the region's September weather pattern doesn't cooperate.

      A PDF version of the TASS report in available on the PCG website at: http://www.plainscotton.org/rkh/TASS081210.pdf

 

Texas District Estimates 2009 and 2010*

Upland Cotton

Planted Acres

Harvested Acres

Yield per Acre

Production

2009

2010

2009

2010

2009

2010

2009

2010

District

1,000 acres

1,000 acres

pounds

1,000 bales

1 - N

600.0

790.0

501.0

755.0

880

1,005

918.0

1,580.0

1 - S

2,667.0

2,990.0

1,929.0

2,890.0

642

731

2,579.0

4,400.0

2 - N

340.5

390.0

286.0

375.0

594

614

354.0

480.0

2 - S

509.0

540.0

407.0

530.0

369

661

313.0

730.0

4

62.5

115.0

56.7

110.0

477

611

56.3

140.0

7

176.0

205.0

136.2

200.0

579

756

164.2

315.0

8 - N

51.5

55.0

24.2

53.0

712

1,177

35.9

130.0

8 - S

338.0

295.0

16.7

290.0

356

836

12.4

505.0

9

90.5

135.0

77.4

130.0

526

738

84.8

200.0

10 - S

74.7

95.0

23.2

80.0

602

720

29.1

120.0

OtherDist.

90.3

90.0

42.6

87.0

826

1,103

73.3

200.0

State

5,000

5,700

3,500

5,500

634

768

4,620

8,800

Source: National Agricultural Statistics Service;
* = preliminary August 2010

 

 

Texas NCC Producer-Ginner Conferences

Dates, times and locations

Monday, August 16: 10:00 a.m. - 2:30 p.m.
Lubbock, TX - Texas Tech University Animal & Food Sciences Building, Room 101.
(NW of United Spirit Arena and the intersection of 18th Street and Indiana Ave.)

Thursday, August 19: 9:00 a.m. – Noon
Haskell, TX - Haskell Civic Center, 200 South Avenue B

Thursday, August 19: 9:00 a.m. – Noon
San Angelo, TX - Texas AgriLife Research & Extension Center, 7887 US Highway 87, North

      Lunch will be provided to participants at all three meetings; however, RSVPs are requested so that an accurate estimate of attendees can be tabulated. Producers, ginners and agri-business people who are planning to attend the meetings are encouraged to RSVP their intentions to NCC Member Services staff from their area. To RSVP or for additional information contact any of the following:

  Brett Cypert - (325) 895-1841 - bcypert@cotton.org

  Susan Everett - (806) 441-7480 -severett@cotton.org

  Mike Johnson - (580) 335-1947 - mjohnson@cotton.org

  Rick King - (806) 777-1234 - rking@cotton.org

 

 

THE HAND THAT FEEDS U.S.

http://www.thehandthatfeedsus.org/

 

 

CRP Adding Environmental Benefits;
CRP Sign-up 39 Ends August 27, 2010

Friday, Lubbock, Texas                             

      The USDA Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) is a voluntary program that helps agricultural producers protect millions of acres of American topsoil from erosion and is designed to safeguard the Nation's natural resources.

      Producers enrolled in CRP plant long-term, resource-conserving covers to control soil erosion, improve water and air quality, and enhance wildlife habitat.

      The program is administered by the Farm Service Agency (FSA) with the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) providing technical assistance through conservation planning.

      CRP land in the High Plains and South Plains regions accounts for eighty percent of the total enrolled acres in the state.

      With the recent announcement for a new program enrollment from the FSA, producers with expired contract acres and additional marginal cropland acres will have the opportunity to apply for the program during the scheduled signup period for August 2 through August 27.

      The NRCS will provide the technical assistance to landowners who are approved for CRP general signup 39. Producers enrolling in the CRP program will work with NRCS representatives in their respective counties to develop a conservation plan to establish permanent grass cover for new land offers and for enhancement of existing permanent grass stands to meet program requirements.

      Program participants voluntarily remove environmentally sensitive land from agricultural production by entering into long-term contracts for 10 to 15 years. In exchange, participants receive annual rental payments and a payment of up to 50 percent of the cost of establishing conservation practices from FSA.

      Conservation priority areas for the new CRP program signup have been set up by FSA to increase environmental benefits for air quality, water quality and wildlife habitat to target specific areas in the High Plains and South Plains regions.

      Brandt Underwood, NRCS agronomist in Lubbock says, "CRP established grass cover provides producers the opportunity to improve air quality by reducing wind erosion from highly erodible soils on the farm. The reduction in wind erosion reduces particulate emissions, which results in cleaner air.

      "CRP also helps to improve both water quality and water quantity," Underwood continues. "The establishment of permanent grasses reduces runoff which helps to decrease non-point source pollution. Water savings can be achieved on acres that were irrigated prior to grass establishment. Farmland acres enrolled in the program are no longer irrigated and can provide results in water savings for the Ogallala Aquifer."

      By reducing water runoff and sedimentation, CRP also protects groundwater and helps improve the condition of lakes, rivers, ponds and streams. Acreage enrolled in the CRP is planted to resource-conserving vegetative covers, making the program a major contributor to wildlife population increases in many parts of the country. As a result, CRP has provided significant opportunities for hunting on private lands.

      Manuel DeLeon, NRCS wildlife biologist for the High Plains region says, "The wildlife resource in our area stands to gain from all approved CRP offers. The permanent establishment of grasses and forbs provide food and cover for wildlife such as bob white quail, lesser-prairie chicken, deer and other wildlife."

      For more information about conservation and environmental benefits from CRP contact the local USDA Service Center in your county, listed under USDA in the Yellow Pages, or access the information on the Texas NRCS Web site at http://www.tx.nrcs.usda.gov .