Arkansas Senator Blanche Lincoln Named
New Senate Agriculture Committee Chairman

Friday, September 11, 2009                      by Shawn Wade

      Topping the week's agricultural news cycle was the naming of Arkansas Senator Blanche Lincoln as the new chairman of the Senate Agriculture, Nutrition and Forestry Committee.

      Lincoln's ascension to the Senate Agriculture Committee chair was the result of key decisions by fellow Democratic Senators Chris Dodd of Connecticut and Tom Harkin of Iowa.

      "The naming of Senator Blanche Lincoln can only be viewed as a positive for High Plains cotton producers," says Plains Cotton Growers Executive Vice President Steve Verett. "Coming from Arkansas Sen. Lincoln understands the cotton industry and the different challenges that face the family farmers that produce our nation's cotton."

      "Sen. Lincoln's ability to educate colleagues unfamiliar with agriculture issues and her willingness to communicate balanced, well-informed counterpoints to criticisms of the structure and implementation of U.S. agriculture programs has benefitted farmers and ranchers nationwide.

      "We are pleased to get the opportunity to work closely with her and her staff to support the interests of this nation's agricultural sector," concluded Verett.

      Lincoln's opportunity was created by the initial decision of Senator Dodd to remain chair of the powerful Senate Banking Committee in lieu of taking over the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee (HELP). Dodd was first in line for the Chairmanship of the HELP Committee following the death of Massachusetts Senator Ted Kennedy.

      The impact of Dodd's decision on agriculture was that it opened the door to the HELP Committee chairmanship to Senator Harkin, who quickly accepted the post and vacated his chairmanship of the Senate Agriculture Committee.

      Industry response to Senator Lincoln's appointment was overwhelmingly positive based on her longstanding commitment to addressing the needs of agricultural producers at every level.

      The positive reviews extended to her counterparts on the Senate and House Agriculture Committees as well.

      Senator Saxby Chambliss (R-GA), Ranking Republican Member on the Senate Agriculture Committee called Lincoln "one of the most well-versed members of this body when it comes to agriculture and rural policy." He added, "I have a tremendous amount of respect for her and I am confident that under her leadership, we will continue to work on behalf of all agriculture."

      House Agriculture Committee Chairman Collin C. Peterson of Minnesota said, "Senator Lincoln's passion and support for American agriculture make her an excellent choice to chair the Senate Agriculture Committee. She grew up on a farm and knows first-hand how much hard work and dedication it requires. I look forward to working with her on the issues that matter to agriculture and rural America."

 

Texas Production Unchanged; High Plains
Estimate Includes Acreage & Yield Adjustments

Friday, September 11, 2009                      by Shawn Wade

      USDA's National Agricultural Statistics Service left Texas Upland cotton production prospects unchanged at 5.4 million bales, despite making a bevy of changes to acreage and yield numbers at the district level.

      The majority of the changes were a direct result of being able to apply newly available Farm Service Agency acreage certification information to the various crop reporting districts.

      The reshuffled acreage numbers, which added 100,000 acres to the states initial cotton plantings but left harvested acreage unchanged, combined with improved yield prospects in every district but one to paint an entirely different picture of the State's number one row crop heading into the month of September.

      With no change in USDA's estimate that 3.7 million acres of cotton are headed to harvest, from initial plantings of 5.0 million acres, the interesting part of the September report is matching up the location of the remaining cotton acres and the yields that are expected to materialize from each area.

      Zeroing in on the High Plains production region, which includes districts 1-N and 1-S, USDA revised planted acreage down 60,000 from August's 3.34 million to 3.28 million acres.

      The High Plains also saw harvested acreage revised downward by 80,000 acres to settle at 2.53 million acres. Breaking High Plains harvested acreage down at the district level shows 1-N is expected to harvest 505,000 acres, up 35,000 from the August estimate, and district 1-S is now expected to harvest 2.025 million acres, down 115,000 acres from the previous month. Offsetting much of the acreage differences, though, were improvements in overall yield prospects for both crop reporting districts.

      Yield wise the districts both saw increases that helped offset the impact of 80,000 fewer net harvested acres. District 1-N yields are now forecast to be 30 pounds better that the previous month at 1,036 pounds per acre. District 1-S yields were bumped a modest 5 pounds to rise to 718 pounds per harvested acre.

      The combination of acreage and yield changes leaves the High Plains with a production forecast of 4.12 million bales and a net production decrease of only 45,000 bales.

      The forecast seems to bear out what many crop observers have been communicating following a hot, dry August. It appears that August weather appears to have greatly improved the prospects of the area's irrigated crop and ultimately put a cap on what the dryland crop will be able to produce.

      Recent rains and seasonal temperatures have broken the previous month's weather pattern and hopefully yield losses in many dryland fields. Favorable weather from this point forward will allow irrigated to mature fully and dryland crops to focus remaining resources on filling and maturing bolls that survived the August weather.

      Overall, the USDA report solidifies the belief that the High Plains is capable of producing its fifth 4 million bale crop in since 2004.

2009-crop Upland Cotton Production Estimates

Texas Reporting District, September 11, 2009

Districts

Planted

Harvested

Yield

Production

 

1,000 acres

Pounds

1,000 bales

1-N

595.0

505.0

1,036.0

1,090.0

1-S

2,685.0

2,025.0

718.0

3,030.0

2-N

325.0

280.0

651.0

380.0

2-S

505.0

450.0

352.0

330.0

4

60.0

59.0

447.0

55.0

7

175.0

160.0

720.0

240.0

8-N

50.0

30.0

544.0

34.0

8-S

340.0

20.0

576.0

24.0

9

90.0

85.0

424.0

75.0

10-N

-

-

-

-

10-S

75.0

30.0

960.0

60.0

Other districts

100.0

56.0

703.0

82.0

STATE    

5,000.0

3,700.0

701.0

5,400.0

Source: National Agricultural Statistics Service

 

Want the facts about the U.S. farm policy.

Get what you need at:

www.farmpolicyfacts.com

 

 

September 10 Upland Cotton AWP Announcement

      The Department of Agriculture's Commodity Credit Corporation announced the adjusted world price (AWP) for Strict Low Middling (SLM) 1-1/16 inch (leaf grade 4, micronaire 3.5-3.6 and 4.3-4.9, strength 25.5-29.4 grams per tex, length uniformity of 79.5-82.4 percent) upland cotton (base quality), adjusted to U.S. quality and location, the fine count adjustment (FCA), the coarse count adjustment (CCA), and the loan deficiency payment rate that will be in effect from 12:01 a.m., Eastern Time, Friday, September 11, 2009, through midnight, Eastern Time, Thursday, September 17, 2009.

      The next announcement of the AWP, FCA, CCA, and LDP The next announcement of the AWP, FCA, CCA, and LDP rate for upland cotton will be on Thursday, September 17, 2009, at 4:00 p.m., Eastern Time.

UPLAND COTTON ANNOUNCEMENT

September 10, 2009

                                                                                                   Cents/lb.

Adjusted World Price (AWP)                                                       46.55

Fine Count Adjustment (FCA) 2008 Crop                              0.00

Fine Count Adjustment (FCA) 2009 Crop                              0.00

Coarse Count Adjustment (CCA)                                                    0.00

Loan Deficiency Payment Rate                                                    5.45

 

This week's AWP, FCA, and CCA are determined as follows:

FE Price                                                                                    62.92

Adjustments:

         Avg. costs to market                             -13.07

         SLM 1-1/16 inch cotton                - 3.30

Sum of Adjustments                                                                 -16.37

ADJUSTED WORLD PRICE                                                46.55

2009 High Plains Event Calendar

Event:

Date:

Moore/Sherman Counties Cotton Tour

September 14

 

Cochran County Crop Tour

September 15

 

West Texas Agricultural Chemicals Institute Conf., Reese Technology Center, Lubbock

September 16 – Reese Technology Center

For more information go to: http://wtaci.tamu.edu

Texas AgriLife Extension Center – Lubbock, Centennial Celebration

 

September 17 – Registration begins at 10:00 a.m.

Floyd County Ag Tour

 

September 22

After CRP: Options for Expired Conservation Reserve Program Lands in the High Plains of Texas

 

Location: Randall Co. AgrLife Extension Center, 200 Brown Rd., Canyon, TX.

Time: 9:00 a.m.

 

September 24 – RSVP by Sept 22 to Palo Duro SWCD, Canyon, at 806-655-1055 ext. 3, or Tierra Blanca SWCD, Hereford, at 806-364-0530, ext. 3.

Motley/Dickens/Briscoe/Hall Counties Crop Tour

September 29

 

 

Industry Field Days:

Date:

Americot / NexGen Field Day

 

September 22 – corner of 146th Street and Martin Luther King Blvd., Lubbock

 

Monsanto/D&PL Field Days

 

September 22 – Consultant

September 23 – Producer

 

Bayer CropScience/Fibermax Field Days

 

October 1

October 2

 

All-Tex Seed Field Day

October 7

 

 

Waste Pesticide Cleanup Dates:

Information:

 

September 14 - Moore County

Moore County Gin, 11800 US Hwy 287, Dumas, TX (six miles north of Dumas on Hwy287).

 

 

Contact Moore County Extension Agent Marcel Fischbacher at 806-935-2594 (mhfischbacher@ag.tamu.edu) for more information.

 

September 16 - Deaf Smith County

Deaf Smith County Bull Barn, 108 Dairy Road, Hereford, TX

Contact Deaf Smith County Extension Agent Rick Auckerman, at 806-364-3573 (r-auckerman@tamu.edu) for more information.

 

October 12 - Lubbock County

Crop Production Services, 880 Industrial Drive, Slaton, TX

Contact Lubbock County Extension Agent Mark Brown at 806-775-1680 (cm-brown@tamu.edu) for more information.

 

October 14, 2009 - Gaines County

Agriliance, 101 Loop Hwy (US 83), Seagraves, TX

Contact Gaines County Extension Agent Terry Millican at 432-758-4006 ext. 238 (gaines@ag.tamu.edu) for more information.