Planting Progress Jumps Ahead; Storms
Drive Interest In 2007 Replant Decision Guide

Friday, May 30, 2008                                 By Shawn Wade

      Taking full advantage of aweek of open weather, High Plains cotton producers have managed to take thearea from being a week behind their normal planting benchmark to slightly aheadof the game heading into the first week of June.

      Looking at the crop progressreports from USDA, which track planting progress at the state level, shows astriking parallel to the 2007 planting season through May 27. The onlydifference is that the overall slow down in progress was attributable tocompletely opposite circumstances.

      In 2007 many growers wereforced to plant their crops slightly later than normal due to plentiful andfrequent rainfall that caused delays early in the planting period. This yearthe opposite holds true as a majority of the delay has been caused by dryconditions in many areas of the High Plains.

      At the end of last week theHigh Plains was estimated to be just more than 50 percent planted – aposition they normally find themselves in a full week earlier.

      Best estimates following whathas generally been a good week of planting activity indicate growers have mostlikely caught up to their long term average planting progress through the endof May and might even be slightly ahead of the curve. It appears that as muchas 75-80 percent of the area’s expected cotton acres may now be planted.

      While planting rains havearrived in many parts of the High Plains, some areas are still on the outsidelooking in. Having waited for a planting rain about as long as they could,dryland growers south of Lamesa toward Big Spring and Stanton have begundry-planting their fields in order to have seed in place should the moisturesituation improve toward the end of the planting window.

      Weather issues, as always,are a major concern for growers and scattered occurrences of hail and blowingsand are causing some crops to be replanted.

      Several areas, which needed arain to get dryland crops planted or help crops that had already emerged,received at least some of what they needed, while areas that were looking foropen weather to finish planting got what they needed as well.

      As noted above, the weathersituation wasn’t quite perfect, however, as the storms that did visit the areabrought their fair share of hail and blistering winds that damaged alreadyemerged crops. Caught in these circumstances, growers are busy evaluatingfields and working with insurance providers to see what their next step willbe.

      In southern areas mostgrowers will likely seek permission from their insurance providers to replantlost crops. At the other end of the spectrum, the decisions being made byproducers and insurance providers in northern areas are significantly differentsince this area has now reached the FCIC Final Planting Date for cotton of May31.

REPLANT DECISION GUIDE AVAILABLE

      According to High PlainsTexas AgriLife Extension Cotton Specialist Dr. Randy Boman, it is important forgrowers that incur damage to newly emerged crops to inspect fields to determinethe amount of damage incurred.

      “Replanting decisions varyfrom producer to producer and many times county to county,” says Boman. “It isimportant to get a handle on the root health of the plants, stem bruising, etc.”

      To help growers evaluate thestatus of damaged crops, and decide whether or not to replant a damaged stand,Boman suggests growers refer to the publication Making Replant Decisions inCotton -2007 whichcan be downloaded from the Lubbock Texas AgriLife Research and Extension Centerwebsite at: http://lubbock.tamu.edu/cotton/pdf/makingreplantdecisions07.pdf

      Boman also advises growers toremember that seed companies do have replant programs providing full or partialseed replacement benefits. Information about 2008 Replant programs is availableon the Plains Cotton Growers website (http://www.plainscotton.org/SeedDroughtRelief08.html) or, growers can call their localseed company representative.

 

April Marketing Figures Stay Low But
Higher Prices Continue To Chip Away 07 CCP

Friday, May 30, 2008                                 By Shawn Wade

      CumulativeUpland cotton marketings for the first nine months of the 2007-marketing yeartotaled 10.289 million-bales according to information released May 30 by the USDANational Agricultural Statistics Service.

      That figure is1.567 million bales less than was marketed through the same period last year.USDA estimated April 2008 marketings at a low 486,000 bales. The only brightspot for growers selling cotton then was that the average selling price for themonth of April was reportedly 62.1 cents per pound.

      The preliminaryprices estimate for May 2008 of 60.7 cents would be a 2.0 percent decline fromthe April 2008 price, but still 37 percent above prices from a year ago. TheMay price, if realized would be down 1.4 cents from the previous month but is16.7 cents above May 2007 prices.

      So far the 2007Upland Cotton Weighted Average Price calculated through April 2008 stands at56.64 cents per pound.

      With three-quartersof the marketing year now past, the calculated 2007 Weighted Average Price is4.64 cents above the 52-cent threshold where the Upland cotton Counter-cyclicalpayment begins to drop below the 13.73 cent maximum payment rate.

      The followingtable shows the average price received each month by farmers and the associatedweighted average price based on prices and cumulative marketings from August 1,2007 through March 31, 2008.

      The2007 Counter-cyclical payment rate authorized under the 2002 Farm Bill will bebased on the 12-month Weighted Average Price Received by growers. For cottonthe 12-month Weighted Average Price will reflect price and marketings for the2007 marketing year. The 2007 cotton marketing year began August 1, 2007 andends July 31, 2008.

UplandCotton Average Price Received by
Growers ThroughApril 2008

(Weighted by Marketings)

 

Marketings

Prices

 

(000's of Running bales)

(cents/Lb.)

 

Monthly

Cum.

Monthly

Weighted

August

1,762

1,762

44.90

44.90

September

373

2,135

52.00

46.14

October

949

3,084

55.20

48.93

November

1,464

4,548

57.00

51.53

December

1,529

6,077

59.20

53.46

January

1,839

7,916

60.70

55.14

February

1.339

9,315

61.90

56.16

March

488

9,803

60.50

56.37

April

486

10,289

62.10

56.64

May

n/a

n/a

60.70*

n/a

Source:National Agricultural Statistics Service; * = preliminary

 

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