JANUARY CROP REPORT INCLUDES SLIGHT
INCREASE IN 2007 HIGH PLAINS CROP ESTIMATE

Friday, January 18, 2008                          By Shawn Wade

      Thelatest look at the 2007 High Plains cotton crop by USDA's National AgriculturalStatistics Service (NASS) included a slight increase in the region's estimatedproduction to 5.43 million bales, up from 5.3 million bales projected inDecember for crop reporting districts 1-N and 1-S.

      Theadjustments were included in the NASS January Crop Production report releasedJanuary 11, 2008 and further refine yield projections for all Texas cropreporting districts.

      TheHigh Plains changes amounted to a 70,000-bale drop in overall production indistrict 1-N. The drop was a result of the downward revision in 1-N expectedyields of 62 pounds from 1,040 to 978 pounds per harvested acre.

      Onthe other side of the ledger was a 200,000-bale increase in district 1-Sproduction that resulted from a 39 pound per acre yield increase from 799 to838 pounds per acre.

      Thenet effect was a 130,000-bale production increase to 5.43 million bales. Goodweather during the last half of the season plus an above average, early seasonmoisture situation allowed the 2007 crop to overcome its' somewhat slow start.

      Thefavorable weather also allowed yields to reach record levels with the areapoised to set a new all-time record yield per harvested acre in theneighborhood of 840 pounds per acre. This would be some 54 pounds above thecurrent yield record of 786 pounds set in 2005, when the area broke the 5 millionbale mark.

      As itstands the 2007 crop will most likely go down as number two in the recordbooks, just short of the 5.62 million-bale crop produced on the Plains in 2005.

      Whetheror not the 2007 crop has a chance to challenge for the top spot, which itcurrently trails by just 190,000 bales, will depend on the final adjustmentsNASS makes when reconciling final ginning figures with final planted andharvested acreage adjustments.

      Thefollowing table includes district level estimates for 2007 and final 2006-cropproduction and acreage figures as released by NASS on January 11.

2007 TEXAS UPLAND COTTON ESTIMATES 1/

Districts

Planted Acres

Harvested Acres

Yield

Production

 

2006

2007

2006

2007

2006

2007

2006

2007

 

1,000 acres

1,000 acres

Pounds

1,000 bales

1-N

994.7

590.0

850.1

540.0

889

978

1,575.2

1,100.0

1-S

2,883.2

2,600.0

1,880.4

2,480.0

637

838

2,497.1

4,330.0

2-N

426.3

340.0

251.2

340.0

497

706

260.2

500.0

2-S

548.0

440.0

265.6

440.0

311

742

171.9

680.0

4

157.9

85.0

156.5

85.0

482

678

157.0

120.0

7

189.0

160.0

92.8

155.0

679

836

131.2

270.0

8-N

109.2

60.0

58.7

55.0

885

873

108.2

100.0

8-S

455.8

300.0

147.1

295.0

716

862

219.4

530.0

9

236.6

150.0

228.5

145.0

881

662

419.2

200.0

10-N

62.0

17.0

715

55.3

10-S

266.2

100.0

85.4

95.0

687

657

122.3

130.0

Other

71.1

75.0

66.7

70.0

855

960

83.0

140.0

STATE

6,400.0

4,900.0

4,100.0

4,700.0

679

827

5,800.0

8,100.0

1/ Preliminary, January,2008. Source: USDA, NASS

      Withsuch a large crop, you might expect quality to be a potential down side to the2007 crop. That is not the case, however, as the crop will not only set recordsfor yield and production, but is also on-track to be the highest quality cropever produced on the High Plains.

      Takinga look at the latest reports from the Lubbock and Lamesa, Texas USDA CottonClassing offices illustrates just how impressive this crop is from a qualitystandpoint.

      Havingclassed just over 4.1 million bales to date, the Lubbock and Lamesa offices arestill averaging color grades of 21 or better on 80-plus percent of the cottonthey have evaluated.

      AverageMicronaire readings have stayed above 4.0, with less that 12 percent of thecrop overall falling into the discount Micronaire range.

      Strengthmeasurements that are averaging well above 29 grams per tex could allow thearea to set a new record for strength in 2007 as well.

      Favorableharvest weather has been one of the most important ingredients to the 2007 crop'squality situation. With so many quality characteristics able to be damaged bypoor weather, the open harvest and ginning season growers have experienced thusfar has been a boon to them on many levels. Not only has it allowed for thetimely harvest of the crop, it has also allowed few opportunities for thequality of the crop to be degraded.

      Outsideof the Color grades, the best measure of the positive impact from good weatherare the generally low leaf grades and the small portion of the crop that hasreceived discounts for bark or other extraneous matter.

      Overall,Leaf grades at both offices are averaging between 2.3-2.4. When it comes toextraneous matter, less than 6 percent of the one million bales classed atLamesa have been downgraded for bark, while less than 3 percent of the 3.1million bales classed at Lubbock have been received a bark discount.

2007-CROP HIGH PLAINS COTTON QUALITY SUMMARY

 

 

Week Ending January 17, 2008:

 

Office

Bales

Color

Leaf

Staple

Lamesa

88,299

21+

2.56

35.90

Lubbock

180,209

21+

2.68

35.95

 

Mike

Strength

Uniformity

Bark

Lamesa

4.15

29.68

80.82

7.5%

Lubbock

4.05

29.35

80.53

6.2%

 

 

Season Totals To Date:

 

Office

Bales

Color

Leaf

Staple

Lamesa

1,033,527

21+

2.35

36.07

Lubbock

3,118,421

21+

2.44

36.01

 

Mike

Strength

Uniformity

Bark

Lamesa

4.20

29.87

80.88

5.5%

Lubbock

4.07

29.59

80.62

2.5%

Source: USDA AMS Cotton Division

 

Wantthe facts about the U.S. farm policy. Get what you need at:

www.farmpolicyfacts.com

 

SW FARM & RANCH CLASSIC: JAN. 31-FEB. 2

Friday, January 18, 2008                          By Shawn Wade

      Thisyear's Southwest Farm & Ranch Classic is set for January 31 through February2 at the Lubbock Memorial Civic Center, 1501 Mac Davis Lane (6thStreet) in Lubbock.

      Attendeeswill be able to view both indoor and outdoor exhibits each day featuring thelatest in agricultural equipment and service providers. Admission and parkingfor those attending the three-day show is free.

      Onceagain part of this year's show will be the Community Quilters Guild, who willprovide on-site quilting demonstrations and tips; the South Plains AntiqueTractor Association, providing a look back at the equipment used by farmers andranchers through the years; and demonstrations from renowned horse trainer VannHargis each day.

Lubbock Chamber of Commerce PowerBreakfast

      TheLubbock Chamber of Commerce will kick off the fourth annual Southwest Farm andRanch Classic with a breakfast at 7:30 a.m. Thursday, January 31, in theBanquet Hall of the Lubbock Memorial Civic Center. Serving line will open at7:15 a.m.

      Keynotespeaker Tom Sell with Combest, Sell & Associates will discuss the Farm Billand its importance to the local economy, particularly how Lubbock benefits fromsound farm policy and the potential effects to Lubbock if that policy were notin place.

      Ticketsfor the breakfast are $15 for members and $20 for non-members. Tablesponsorships are available for $300 and include a listing on the program,banner placement at the breakfast, and prime reserved seating for eight people.

      Registration/cancellationdeadline is 5 p.m. Monday, January 28. For more information or to reserve yourseat, click on the "Register Now" button above. You may also call(806) 761-7000 or e-mail info@lubbockbiz.org.

 

2008 TEXAS AGRILIFEEXTENSION SERVICE
PRODUCTION CONFERENCE DATES

      Helping farmers stay up onthe latest trends in crop production, marketing, and management is the numberone goal of High Plains crop production conferences. Sponsored by TexasAgriLife Extension Service, the Conferences will once again offer a bounty ofuseful production information for producers entering the 2008 growing season.

      For those that haven't heard,Texas AgriLife Extension Service is the new name of Texas CooperativeExtension, which provides Texans in all 254 counties with non-biased,research-based education programs and services in agriculture and naturalresources, 4-H and youth development, family and consumer sciences, andcommunity economic development.

      Also getting a new moniker isTexas AgriLife Research, formerly identified as the Texas AgriculturalExperiment Station, which annually conducts more than $150 million inagriculture and life-sciences research.

      This year's Extensionconferences are scheduled at multiple locations throughout the area during themonths of January and February to provide growers multiple opportunities toparticipate without having to travel too far from home.

      By attending the conferencesproducers can also earn continuing education units (CEUs) necessary to maintainprivate and commercial applicator licenses.

 

2008 South Plains AgricultureConferences

 

Date:

Name/Location/Information:

Jan. 21

West Plains Cotton Conference

Location: South Plains College (Sundown Room), Levelland.

Information: Registration begins at 8:00 a.m. and conference will continue until 3:00 p.m. There is not a registration fee and 5 CEU's will be given. Call the Extension office in Hockley County at 806-894-3159 for more details.

Jan. 22

Caprock Crop Production Conference

Location: Pioneer Memorial Building, 101 West Main, Crosbyton.

Information: Registration begins at 7:00 a.m. and conference will continue until 4:10 p.m. Registration fee is $25.00 if received before January 16 and add $10.00 if received after January 16 and 7.5 CEU's will be given. Call the Extension office in Floyd County at 806-983-4912 or Crosby County at 806-675-2347 for more details.

Jan. 23

Southern Mesa Agriculture Conference

Location: Movieland Theatre, 604 N. Austin Ave., Lamesa.

Information: Registration begins at 7:15 a.m. and conference will continue until 4:30 p.m. Registration fee is $20.00 and 5 CEU's will be given. Call the Extension office in Dawson County at 806-872-3444 for more details.

Jan. 24

Llano Estacado Cotton Conference

Location: Bailey County Coliseum, 2206 West American Blvd., Muleshoe.

Information: Registration begins at 8:00 a.m. An agenda will be forthcoming after the first of the year. Call the Extension office in Bailey County at 806-272-4584 for more details.

Jan. 24

High Plains Vegetable Conference

Location: West Texas A&M University (Alumni Banquet Facility), Canyon.

Information: Registration begins at 7:45 a.m. and conference will continue until 4:00 p.m. Registration fee is $25.00 if received by January 15 or $30.00 at the door and 6.5 CEU's are pending approval. Call Dr. Russ Wallace at 806-746-6101 for details.

Jan. 31 - Feb. 2

Extension agriculture seminars @ Southwest Farm & Ranch Show

Location: Lubbock Memorial Civic Center, 1501 Mac Davis (6th Street), Lubbock.

Information: Show hours are from 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Thursday – Saturday. Free admission and free parking. Call the Extension office in Lubbock County at 806-775-1680.

Feb. 1

Regional Irrigation Conference

Information: Call the Extension office in Lubbock County at 806-775-1680.

Feb. 5

Sandyland Agriculture Conference

Location: Gaines County Civic Building, 402 N.W. 5th, Seminole.

Information: Registration begins at 8:00 a.m. and conference will continue until 4:00 p.m. There is not a registration fee and a meal will be provided. Five CEU's are pending approval. Call the Extension office in Gaines County at 432-758-4006 for more details.

Feb. 6

South Plains Agriculture Conference

Location: American Legion Hall, 800 Seagraves Rd., Brownfield.

Information: Registration begins at 8:00 a.m. and conference will continue until 3:45 p.m. There is not a registration fee and a meal will be provided. Five CEU's are pending approval. Call the Extension office in Terry County at 806-637-4060 for more details.

Feb. 6

Hale and Swisher County Crops Conference

Information: Call the Extension office in Hale County at 806-291-5267 or Swisher County at 806-995-3726.

Feb. 20

Cotton Production Workshop

Information: Call the Extension office in Lubbock County at 806-775-1680.

Source: Texas AgriLife ExtensionService