PCG MAKING PLANS FOR ORGANIZATION'S
50TH ANNUAL MEETING, APRIL 13, 2007

Friday, March 2, 2007                          By Shawn Wade

      Plans are underway for thePlains Cotton Growers, Inc. 50th Annual Meeting and cotton producersand industry people across the High Plains will want to make arrangements to beon hand to hear from what is shaping up to be an all-star speaker line-up.

      PCG will hold its 50thAnnual Meeting on Friday April 13, 2007 in conjunction with the Texas CottonGinners Association's Annual Meeting and Trade Show, April 12-13, at theLubbock Memorial Civic Center. PCG's meeting will begin with registration at8:30 a.m. in the Lubbock Memorial Civic Center Banquet Hall.

      This year TCGA is celebratingits 100th Anniversary and the entire High Plains cotton industry isencouraged to help them celebrate their centennial.

      With the preliminary stagesof the 2007 Farm Bill debate underway, interest in the information that will bepresented at the Plains Cotton Growers Annual Meeting should be high.

      PCG Executive Vice PresidentSteve Verett says the goal for this year's Annual Meeting is to provide HighPlains cotton growers an opportunity to get both an insiders view of the 2007Farm Bill process, as well as a thorough analysis of the mechanics shaping thedebate.

      To provide that insiders viewVerett says an invitation has been issued to House Agriculture CommitteeChairman Collin Peterson (D-MN) to be the keynote speaker for PCG's 50thAnnual Meeting.

      Verett notes he is hopefulthat Chairman Peterson's schedule will allow him the opportunity to participatein the PCG meeting because of the tremendous leadership and vision he has shownin the early stages of the Farm Bill debate.

      Verett says he believes HighPlains cotton growers will find Chairman Peterson's thoughts about thedirection he believes U.S. farm policy should take both refreshing andcomforting.

      Two other speakers have alsobeen confirmed for the PCG meeting, both of whom will be intimately involved inthe Farm Bill development process although in very different ways.      Acceptinginvitations to address the PCG membership are Washington-based Farm Policyanalyst James R. Wiesemeyer and former Lubbock area Congressman Larry Combest.

      Wiesemeyer, who has coveredfarm policy in Washington, DC more than twenty years is Vice President,Washington Bureau, for Informa Economics and writes the "Inside Washington"column for Agweb's Pro Farmer newsletter.

      Wiesemeyer's high-energydelivery and incredible insight into the politics and personalities that will ultimatelyshape the 2007 Farm Bill debate are expected to be a must-see portion of thePCG program. Wiesemeyer last spoke to the PCG membership in 2005 and has sincebecome a familiar source for farm policy news and information for many HighPlains cotton producers.

      Former Congressman Combesthas been asked to discuss the creation of the Southwest Council of Agribusiness(SWCA) as well as share his views on the status of the SWCA effort to seek anextension of the provisions of the 2002 Farm Bill. Combest, and his co-workersin Combest Sell & Associates, are representing the SWCA during the 2007Farm Bill debate.

      Combest Sell & Associatesis a consulting firm dedicated to promoting sound U.S. farm policy thatmaintains and grows economic opportunity and jobs in rural America by keepingAmerica's farmers and ranchers strong and competitive.

      Verett notes that the PCGstaff is ironing out the remaining details for this year's program and workingwith Chairman Peterson's staff to secure his participation. Once completed afinal agenda will be released prior to PCG's April 13 meeting.

     

UPLAND COTTON AVERAGE PRICE RECEIVED BY
GROWERS THROUGHJANUARY 2007

Friday, February 2, 2007                            By Shawn Wade

      CumulativeUpland cotton marketings for the first six months of the 2006-marketing yeartotaled 7.882 million bales according to information released February 28 bythe USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service.

      That figure is2.295 million bales off the pace set through the same period last season andreflects the relatively stagnant nature of the export market for U.S. cotton.

      According to USDAestimates January 2006 cotton marketings totaled 1.557 million bales with anaverage selling price of 49.70 cents per pound. So far the 2006 Upland CottonWeighted Average Price calculated through January 2006 stands at 47.81 centsper pound.

      January pricescontinued to reinforce the notion that prices are slowly creeping up, but noone has yet been able to determine what it will take to move prices to a levelthat can start breaking this year's cotton out of the loan.

      With the firstsix months of the marketing year now past, the calculated 2006 Weighted AveragePrice is still 4.19 cents below the 52-cent threshold where 2006-cropCounter-cyclical payment rates would begin to drop. The preliminary mid-monthprice reported for February 2007 was 48.90 cents per pound.

      According toTexas Cooperative Extension Economist Jackie Smith, a slowly rising WeightedAverage Price might cause some to wonder about the possibility of the 2006 CCpayment rate dropping below the 13.73-cent maximum rate.

      When posed withthis question Smith offered the following, "I think it is unlikely that theremainder of the 2006 crop could be sold at a high enough price to increase theaverage price received enough to result in a loss of more than the first two tothree cents of the CC payment. At the current level of cotton futures, itwould just be too costly to try to protect the two to three cents that I thinkis possibly at risk."

      Smith noted thatif the market were to dip into the low 50s in the next few weeks, it would makeit less costly to purchase call options to protect the loss of the first fewcents of the CC payment. He cautioned, though, that such a drop in price couldalso result in significantly lower planted cotton acres, which could allowprices to bounce back in mid summer.

      According toSmith cotton futures prices would have to move all the way back into the mid60s with a commensurate level of marketings to actually see as much as three orfour cents of the CC payment disappear.

      A move up to thatlevel seems unlikely, concludes Smith, given the expected U.S. and world endingstocks for the 2006 crop year and that the prediction of fewer planted acreswhich would have more impact on next year's price.

      The followingtable shows the average price received each month by farmers and the associatedweighted average price based on prices and cumulative marketings from August 1through January 31, 2007.

      The 2006Counter-cyclical payment rate authorized under the 2002 Farm Bill will be basedon the 12-month Weighted Average Price Received by growers. For cotton the12-month Weighted Average Price will reflect price and marketings for the 2006marketing year. The 2006 cotton marketing year began in August 1, 2006 and endsJuly 31, 2007.

 

Average Price Received For2006-crop Upland Cotton
(Weighted byMarketings)

 

Marketings

Prices

 

(000's of Running bales)

(cents/Lb.)

 

Monthly

Cum.

Monthly

Weighted

August

1,970

1,970

45.80

45.80

September

182

2,152

47.30

45.93

October

994

3,146

46.10

45.98

November

1,117

4,263

47.60

46.41

December

2,062

6,325

49.30

47.35

January

1,557

7,882

49.70

47.81

February

na

na

48.90*

na

Source: National AgriculturalStatistics Service; * = preliminary

 

WASTE PESTICIDE COLLECTION DATESANNOUNCED

Friday, March 2, 2007                          By Shawn Wade

      The Texas Commission onEnvironmental Quality, Texas Department of Agriculture and Texas CooperativeExtension are getting together to clean up the Texas countryside during themonth of March.

      As always these AgriculturalWaste Collection Program events are free of charge and open to all Texasresidents, not just farmers and ranchers. Participation is voluntary andconfidential.

      The joint effort is made of aseries of six waste pesticide collection events across Texas. Three of thisyear's scheduled collection sites are located in the West Texas region.

 

      Statewide, collection dateshave been set up for Bryan, Huntsville, Carthage, Pampa, Plainview andBrownfield beginning March 13 and ending March 29.

      High Plains residents will bemost interested in the Pampa (March 26), Plainview (March 28) and Brownfield(March 29) collection dates.

      The Agricultural WasteCollection program will accept leftover banned or unwanted agriculturalpesticides, home chemicals including pesticides paints and thinners,antifreeze, household batteries, aerosol cans, photographic chemicals mercurythermometers, herbicides, gasoline, cleaners, pool chemicals, fluorescent bulbsused motor oil and oil filters, lead acid batteries and other automotiveproducts.

      The program cannot acceptused tires, radioactive materials, explosives, compressed gas cylinders,herbicides containing 2,4,5-TP (Silvex), pesticides or wood preservativescontaining pentachlorophenol in quantities greater than five gallons ornutrient materials that are neither hazardous nor contain pesticide admixtures.

      The following is a list ofscheduled cleanup dates and locations with appropriate contact information forobtaining additional information.

 

Agricultural Waste Pesticide Collections

March 2007 Collection Schedule

 

Date

Time

City—Location

Contact

 

March 13

 

8:00 a.m. –1:00 p.m.

 

Bryan

Brazos Ct. Rd. & Bridge, 2617 Hwy. 21 W

 

Eric Zimmerman,

Co. Extension Agent, 979-823-0129

 

March 14

8:00 a.m. –1:00 p.m.

Huntsville

Kate Barr Ross Memorial Park, 486 SH 75 N

Riggie Lepley,

Co. Extension Agent, 936-435-2426

 

March 16

8:00 a.m. –1:00 p.m.

Carthage

TxDOT Carthage-Area Office, 861 S. Shelby St.

Douglas McKinney, Co. Extension Agent, 903-693-0380

 

March 26

8:00 a.m. –1:00 p.m.

Pampa

Gray County Show Barn, 12125 E. Frederic

Brandon McGinty,

Co. Extension Agent, 806-669-8033

 

March 28

8:00 a.m. –1:00 p.m.

Plainview

Ollie Liner Center,

2000 S. Columbia St.

Michael Dolle,

Co. Extension Agent, 806-291-5267

 

March 29

8:00 a.m. –1:00 p.m.

Brownfield

Terry County Livestock Barn, 1792 CR 430

Chris Bishop,

Co. Extension Agent, 806-637-4060

 

Source: TCEQ, TDA, TCE