Crop InsuranceProviders And RMA Discuss
Procedures For Replant Determinations

Friday, June 10,2005                               By Shawn Wade

      Officials from the USDA Risk ManagementAgency met via conference call with crop insurance providers on June 7 todiscuss the procedures used to determine when it is practical to require aproducer to replant a damaged crop.

      Over the past two weeks asignificant amount of cotton acreage on the Texas High Plains has been damagedduring severe storms that have crossed the area. Storm damage resulted in somequestions regarding what to consider in the decision-making process as towhether it is practical to replant given the revised definitions for both"Practical to Replant" and "Replanting" in 2005 cropinsurance policy provisions.

      Tuesday's call seems to havecleared the air for many companies who are now fully engaged in the process ofhandling producer claims.

      The primary outcome of thediscussions according to RMA was that company representatives, whoseresponsibility is to make the "Practical to Replant" determination,should continue making replant determinations on a case-by-case basis and thata variety of circumstances including the amount of growing season remaininguntil average frost/freeze dates and field conditions can be used to make thedecision just as they have in the past.

      Based on recent conversationswith several company representatives, insurance companies that were concernedabout policy changes to "Practical to Replant" and"Replanting" definitions, are moving ahead with the process in amanner consistent with the methods they have used in the past.

      RMA officials have noted thatdespite the changes that were made in the definitions of "Practical toReplant" and "Replanting" for 2005 there was never an expectationthat a producer would be required to replant damaged crops through the end ofthe late planting period.

      They also point out that itis important for producers to remember that when losses occur before theapplicable Final Planting Date they have an obligation under the crop insurancepolicy to try to plant and/or replant crops through that Final Planting Datewhenever possible.

      For growers that sustain haildamage it is appropriate that they contact their insurance provider to notifythem of the loss and to schedule an evaluation of the damage by a lossadjuster. Such appraisals are typically delayed at least 7 days from the dateof the hail event so that a more accurate evaluation of the crops potential torecover or survive can be made.

 

PINK BOLLWORM INFORMATION

Now Available at:

WWW.PLAINSCOTTON.ORG

 

KRFE AM580 Augments NoonAg Lineup

Friday,June 10, 2005                               By Shawn Wade

      Adding to an expandedagriculture programming line-up, Lubbock's KRFE AM580 has announced theaddition of the "All Ag, All Day" network's "Agriculture Today" to thestation's mid-day programming lineup.

      The show, hosted by "All Ag,All Day" Network Director Tony St. James, will begin airing on KRFE Monday,June 13 at 12 o'clock Noon. The show is currently scheduled to air on thefollowing schedule: Monday - Noon, Tuesday - Noon, Wednesday – 12:30 p.m.,Thursday - Noon and Friday - Noon,

      Combined with the recentreturn of Lubbock farm broadcast veteran Jim Stewart to KRFE on "Today's Agwith Jim Stewart" at 1:30-2:30 p.m. each weekday, KRFE now has the tools toprovide the highest quality agriculture news, weather and market information toarea farmers and ranchers.

 

2004 County ProductionTotals Now Available
From USDA National Ag Statistics Service

Friday, June 10,2005                              By Shawn Wade

      Wow! As impressive as we knewthe results of the 2004 growing season were the release of final county levelproduction figures from the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service putsa fresh emphasis on the magnitude of the 2004 Texas crop.

      Statewide, 2004 Upland Cottonproduction totaled a record-breaking 7.74 million 480-pound bales according tothe final tally reported by USDA NASS on June 10.

      Closer to home 2004'srecord-setting production was just as impressive. The 41-county High Plainsproduction area served by Lubbock-based Plains Cotton Growers was credited witha mind-boggling 4.877 million bales of production in 2004. This amount accountsfor 63 percent of the State's 2004 Upland Cotton production total.

      The 2004-crop's Top Tencotton producing counties in the High Plains region were: Hale, 465,000;Lubbock, 422,700; Gaines, 385,000; Hockley, 373,300; Lynn, 354,500; Crosby,331,000; Lamb, 331,000; Dawson, 330,200; Terry, 319,000; and, Floyd, 262,800.

      Yield per harvested acre inthe region average 715 pounds across all counties. The region's top producingcounty in terms of yield per harvested acre was Parmer County where growersaveraged 943 pounds per acre in 2004. Nine other counties in the regionaveraged 800 pounds per acre or more for the growing season. Only three HighPlains counties averaged less that a bale per harvested acre in 2004.

      Acreage-wise the High Plainsplanted 3.67 million acres of cotton in 2004 and harvested 3.27 million acres, adifference of 403,600 acres. This calculates to a low 10.9 percent abandonmenttotal for the year.

      If history is a reliableguide the 2004 crop will be one that stays at the top of the record book foryears to come.

      A complete listing of the2004 Upland cotton production totals for Texas and other states is available onthe NASS website (www.usda.gov.nass/). Just click on the "Quick Stats" link to search for thedata you want to find.

 

Texas High Plains

2004-crop Upland Cotton Production

Source: National AgriculturalStatistics Service

 

County

Planted

Acres

Harvested

Acres

 

Yield/HA

Production

(480lb Bales)

Andrews

23,000

17,300

677

24,400

Armstrong

2,000

1,000

672

1,400

Bailey

85,300

71,600

701

104,500

Borden

19,600

18,500

537

20,700

Briscoe

39,700

17,600

627

23,000

Carson

24,500

22,700

761

36,000

Castro

78,900

65,500

813

111,000

Cochran

136,600

121,400

710

179,600

Crosby

223,100

216,100

735

331,000

Dallam

**

**

**

**

Dawson

293,500

251,700

630

330,200

Deaf Smith

46,600

34,300

828

59,200

Dickens

25,000

24,300

525

26,600

Floyd

192,000

169,400

745

262,800

Gaines

262,800

212,800

868

385,000

Garza

42,500

41,600

825

71,500

Hale

272,200

261,100

855

465,000

Hansford

**

**

**

**

Hartley

3,200

900

747

1,400

Hemphill

**

**

**

**

Hockley

251,700

240,100

746

373,300

Howard

115,400

105,500

385

84,600

Hutchinson

**

**

**

**

Lamb

206,700

198,000

802

331,000

Lipscomb

**

**

**

**

Lubbock

265,600

260,200

780

422,700

Lynn

300,300

285,400

596

354,500

Martin

144,600

121,400

382

96,700

Midland

29,800

25,600

326

17,400

Moore

7,200

6,900

904

13,000

Motley

26,700

24,200

532

26,800

Ochiltree

1,100

1,100

698

1,600

Oldham

**

**

**

**

Parmer

82,300

70,500

943

138,500

Potter

1,000

700

686

1,000

Randall

3,800

2,600

831

4,500

Roberts

**

**

**

**

Sherman

**

**

**

**

Swisher

80,200

61,000

802

101,900

Terry

256,900

224,900

681

319,000

Yoakum

132,000

96,300

777

155,800

1-N Combined Co.

1,200

1,200

800

2,000

41 County Total

3,677,000

3,273,400

715

4,877,600

** Not reported and included in 1-N CombinedCounties or zero production

 

First 2005 "FOCUS on Entomology" Newsletter
Now Available on Lubbock TAMU Website

Friday, June 10,2005                               By Shawn Wade

      The 2005 planting season israpidly drawing to a close and producers are, in many areas, shifting theirattention from getting the crop established to dealing with in-seasonmanagement issues.

      Over the years one of themost valuable sources of sound, timely management information and advice hasbeen the "FOCUS onEntomology" newsletter which is edited by Texas Cooperative Extensionentomologist Jim Leser at the Lubbock Texas A&M University Research andExtension Center.

      Following this week's first2005 issue of FOCUS the newsletter will be published weekly through the middle ofSeptember. The newsletter is available through a variety of sources includingthe Plains Cotton Growers website (www.plainscotton.org) and directly from TexasCooperative Extension on the Lubbock Extension Center's website: http://lubbock.tamu.edu/focus/

      The 2005 growing season willmark the 40th publication year for the FOCUS newsletter. During those years FOCUS has grown from addressing mostlyinsect management issues to include a full range of cotton management topicsthat are both timely and useful for producers. In addition to cotton relatedinformation FOCUSalso includes timely information on other crops that are of interest to HighPlains producers.

      This week's FOCUS topics pertinent to cotton includeThrips, Pink Bollworms, Cotton Replant Guidelines, recognizing the effects ofenvironmental damage to crops, and information about early season herbicideoptions.

      Producers should alsoremember that the Lubbock Center's website has an extensive list of helpful publicationsthat can assist growers with a variety of crop questions and at virtually anystage of crop management.

 

2005-2006 NCCLeadership Class
Applications Accepted Through July 1

      The National Cotton Council isaccepting applications for the 2005-06 Cotton Leadership Class through July 1.

      Those interested in applyingcan visit the Cotton Leadership Program's web site at http://leadership.cotton.orgto review theprogram curriculum, eligibility requirements and download the application. Thesite also includes a contact form, which allows users to submit questions,request information and schedule a personal visit with local program alumni.

      The 2005-06 class, which willbe comprised of four producers and one participant from each of the other sixindustry segments, will be announced in August by the NCC's Cotton LeadershipDevelopment Committee.

      The NCC's Cotton LeadershipProgram seeks to identify potential industry leaders and provide them developmentaltraining. During five sessions of activity across the Cotton Belt, classparticipants visit with industry leaders and observe production, processing andresearch. They also meet with lawmakers and government agency representativesduring a visit to Washington, DC, and attend the NCC's annual meeting and itsmid-year board of directors meeting.

      The program, initiated in1983, is supported by a grant to The Cotton Foundation from DuPont CropProtection and is managed by NCC's Member Services department. For moreinformation, contact NCC's Member Services at 901-274-9030 or their local NCCMember Services representative.