3rd Annual Texas Commodity Symposium

Scheduled For December 3 In Amarillo

Friday, November 14, 2003                        ByShawn Wade

      High Plains cotton producersshould mark December 3 on their calendars and plan on a trip to Amarillo totake in the 3rd Annual Texas Commodity Symposium.

      The Symposium is sponsored bythe Corn Producers of Texas, Texas Grain Sorghum Association, Texas WheatProducers Association and for the first time in 2003 Lubbock-based PlainsCotton Growers, Inc. The event is being held in conjunction with the AmarilloFarm and Ranch Show, December 2-4 at the Amarillo Civic Center.

      Scheduled speakers for theTexas Commodity Symposium and the topics they are expected to address are:Trade Issues - Floyd Gaibler, USDA Deputy Under Secretary for Farm and ForeignAgricultural Services; Federal Crop Insurance - Ross Davidson, AdministratorUSDA Risk Management Agency; Farm Service Agency Update - John Fuston,Executive Director Texas FSA; School Finance Reform - Billy Hamilton, TexasComptrollers Office; and USDA Pay Limit Commission Report - Dr. Ed Smith, TexasA&M University.

      The Amarillo Farm & RanchShow includes over 700 exhibits and participation from more than 300 companies.Admission is free and show hours are 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. December 2 & 3,and 9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. December 4.

      For more information call800-827-8007 or on the Internet go to: www.farmshows.com

 

High Quality Defines 2003 High Plains Crop

Friday, November 14, 2003                        ByShawn Wade

      As High Plains cottonproducers wait for a break in the weather so they can renew their 2003 harvestefforts, maintaining quality continues to be an important focus for growerseager to take advantage of higher cotton prices. So far those efforts appear tobe paying off.

      Overall the High Plains cropwill exceed most expectations if it meets the 2.105 million bale productionestimate issued by Texas Ag Statistics Service on November 12. TASS estimatesare issued by crop reporting districts with the High Plains region closelymirroring the boundaries of Districts 1-N and 1-S. Typically the sum of theestimates for these two Districts are used to represent the region’s productionpotential.

      Through November 13, theLubbock and Lamesa USDA Cotton Classing offices have processed a total of600,267 running bales from the 2003 crop. This is approximately 28.5 percent ofthe 2.105 million bales TASS has estimated.

      As expected, the downside forthe 2003 crop remains the significant acreage loss and associated productiondecrease due to widespread hail events early in the season and a record-settingdry spell in July and August that sapped much of the potential from a promisingdryland crop.

      The November TASS report leftharvested acreage constant from the agency’s October estimate, althoughincreases in projected yields in 1-N and 1-S caused an increase in theproduction forecast by 65,000 bales.

      Despite the delayed start tothe harvest season, the crop continues to record high marks for quality acrossthe board.

      The only quality factor thatcould be considered less than ideal to date is Micronaire. Mike readings havetended to be on the high side throughout the season, evidenced by the fact thatto date 22.8 percent of the cotton classed at Lubbock and 19.7 percent of thecotton reviewed at Lamesa recorded readings of 50 or greater.

      Fortunately, the Mike averageappears to be moderating somewhat as the main body of the crop makes its wayfrom field to gin.

      Part of the reason for higherthan expected Mike readings early on is attributed to the idea that most of theearly season crop was from dryland areas that received less than optimalgrowing conditions.

      The following tableillustrates a breakdown of the key quality factors for the 2003 crop throughNovember 13.

 

2003 High Plains Quality

through November 13, 2003

 

 

Lubbock

 

Lamesa

 

Week

Season

Week

Season

Bales classed:

104,284

407,978

44,924

192,289

Staple

 

 

 

 

32 &shorter

15.7%

23.1%

6.9%

16.0%

33

14.6%

18.0%

15.6%

19.9%

34

22.7%

22.9%

25.8%

26.1%

35

23.9%

20.7%

24.3%

22.2%

36 &longer

23.1%

15.4%

27.3%

15.8%

Average

34.25

33.77

34.58

33.99

Color

 

 

 

 

11 & 21

87.3%

84.2%

78.3%

75.2%

31

4.9%

6.5%

9.8%

13.1%

41

0.1%

0.2%

1.1%

1.0%

12&22

5.7%

6.8%

6.8%

6.6%

32

0.8%

1.4%

1.6%

2.4%

 

 

 

 

 

Micronaire

 

 

 

 

34 &below

3.5%

2.8%

4.9%

3.6%

35-36

3.6%

2.6%

4.5%

3.2%

37-42

25.7%

20.0%

23.3%

22.0%

43-49

47.5%

51.8%

46.5%

51.6%

50-52

15.2%

18.3%

16.5%

16.4%

53 &above

4.6%

4.5%

4.5%

3.3%

Average

4.47

4.55

4.46

4.50

Strength

 

 

 

 

< 27 g/tex

13.0%

14.3%

11.9%

16.8%

28 g/tex

19.1%

18.7%

12.9%

15.7%

29 g/tex

24.1%

24.2%

16.4%

19.4%

30 g/tex

20.1%

21.3%

20.4%

19.4%

>31 g/tex

23.6%

21.4%

38.5%

28.5%

Average

29.32

29.22

29.90

29.40

Source: USDA-AMS Cotton Division