Cotton has been an integral part of our national fabric since thefounding of our country in 1776, and remains so today.

 

As you celebrate the 227th birthday of these United States ofAmerica, remember that cotton is the white in the Red, White and Blue!

 

We at Plains Cotton Growers, Inc. wish you and yours a

Happy Independence Day.

 

 


Economic ImpactEstimate Highlights

Significance ofJune Crop Losses

Friday,July 4, 2003                                 By Shawn Wade

      Oh what a difference 30days in June can make. Following a pleasant Memorial Day weekend, highlightedby beneficial rainfall across much of the region, June promised to be just whatthe doctor ordered for the High Plains crop.

      Unfortunately, thehistory books will recount June 2003 as a month that put an entirely differentspin on the fate of the regionŐs 3.6 million acre cotton crop.

      During the month, HighPlains cotton fields were blown, drowned, and pummeled by wave after wave ofJune thunderstorms, an adversary that has not been a regular visitor to theregion for several years. So far, some 1.2 million acres, of predominantlyirrigated cotton in the regionŐs northern tier counties, are estimated to havebeen lost.

      Based on recenthistory, that lost acreage can be credited for nearly 50 percent of all HighPlains production over the past couple of years.

      By using the mostrecent 5-year averages for acreage and yield a conservative estimate of whatthe loss of these acres actually means in economic terms can be derived. Usingthe 1998-2002 numbers, the regionŐs 2003 Farm Level economic loss is estimatedto top $320 Million as a direct result of June crop losses.

      Fortunately, everycloud does have a silver lining. Extended areas of the dryland productionregion south of Lubbock carry a slightly delayed, but makeable, crop into themonth of July for the first time in several years.

      Dryland acres have beena piece of the High Plains production puzzle all but missing for several yearsdue to drought. Should they continue to progress, they will help make up at leasta part of the areaŐs lost production potential.

      Remaining irrigated anddryland acres, for the most part, are anywhere from significantly to onlyslightly behind based on the calendar. Either way, producers have a complicatedset of management decisions to work through in order to maximize the productionpotential on every acre that is left.

      Producers wanting tipson managing late cotton, can request the latest version of the TexasCooperative ExtensionŐs ŇManaging Late CottonÓ publication. This valuable guideshould help growers avoid management pitfalls associated with a late cottoncrop. It is currently being updated and should be available in early July.

      Growers may requestcopies through their County Extension agents and from the Lubbock Research andExtension Center. A link to the downloadable version will be provided as soonas it becomes available.

      The following chartshows the 5-year average planted acreage, yield per harvested acre andestimated Farm Level economic loss (calculated at 52˘/lb. crop value) for eachof the counties on the High Plains.

      Amounts were calculatedusing 1998-2002 county average planted acreage and yields per harvested acre,and crop loss estimates prepared by PCG and Texas Cooperative Extension.

 

2003 Farm Level Economic Loss Estimate

through June 30, 2003

 

 

5-Year Ave.

2003

Potential

County

Planted Acres

Yield

per HA

Est. Loss (%)

Economic Impact at Farm Level

Bailey

94,280

467

85.0%

$19,462,749.83

Borden

18,880

336

0.0%

$0.00

Briscoe

43,140

400

61.8%

$5,554,247.00

Castro

82,960

860

52.0%

$19,285,724.52

Cochran

136,400

454

90.0%

$28,955,491.81

Crosby

226,060

407

43.2%

$20,654,869.89

Dawson

293,160

413

1.0%

$644,633.28

Deaf Smith

37,820

619

75.0%

$9,131,631.28

Dickens

24,380

269

0.9%

$30,775.36

Floyd

193,920

527

85.0%

$45,200,298.32

Gaines

286,360

522

10.0%

$7,769,701.78

Garza

44,480

333

7.2%

$554,036.85

Hale

268,580

689

55.0%

$52,957,715.69

Hockley

260,060

425

36.3%

$20,847,104.41

Howard

125,060

262

0.3%

$52,347.98

Lamb

208,620

646

85.0%

$59,544,210.47

Lubbock

279,460

417

20.0%

$12,114,805.89

Lynn

297,680

314

4.1%

$1,999,798.81

Martin

150,240

349

4.2%

$1,131,657.95

Midland

32,820

334

6.3%

$356,369.57

Motley

32,800

201

2.8%

$97,043.57

Parmer

89,580

868

70.0%

$28,313,505.50

Swisher

86,740

650

64.4%

$18,881,479.59

Terry

261,120

410

7.1%

$3,940,835.67

Yoakum

140,020

490

14.9%

$5,296,454.51

25-County Total

3,714,620

494

33.7%

$321,973,349.53