2003 Crop Standing On The Brink ;

2002 Crop Production Figures

Friday,June 13, 2003                   By Shawn Wade

      WhatÕs good for thegoose isnÕt always good for the gander and evidence of how true this old sayingis, is easily found on the Texas High Plains after several rounds of intenseWest Texas weather.

      So far, conventionalwisdom categorizes an estimated 500,000 acres as unsalvageable victims of hail,wind and rain. Add in another 500,000 acres or so suffering varying degrees ofdamage from back-to-back-to-back thunderstorms, and potential losses in 2003acreage and production potential could be staggering.

      On theheels of the storms that have ravaged cotton fields in PCG's 25-county area,many producers are making the decision to re-plant to other crops or stick withcotton. Either way the outlook for 2003has taken a significant hit.

      The flip-side of thecoin, however, is that the same storms that wreaked havoc on early May-plantedcotton fields have opened the door for overdue dryland producers.

      As many irrigatedproducers weigh their options north of Lubbock, the dryland decision-makingprocess for producers south of Lubbock is shaping up as more of a foregoneconclusion Š plant cotton.

      As the remainder ofJune shapes the 2003 crop, producers need to keep in mind that the currentsituation will also impact ongoing boll weevil eradication efforts. Producersare encouraged to keep failed cotton fields free of hostable cotton throughoutthe growing season.

2002-Crop Figures Released by NASS

      Final figures on the 2002 crop showthe Texas High Plains produced 3,245,600 bales on some 2,825,900 harvestedacres in the 25 county region served by Lubbock-based Plains Cotton Growers,Inc. Overall, 2002 production was a significant 752,900 bales better than what thearea produced in 2001.

      Abandonment totaled 756,300 acresin 2002 while harvested acreage increased some 400,000 acres over 2001.

      Yieldwise,the High Plains averaged 551 pounds of lint per harvested acre in 2002.Irrigated cotton averaged an impressive 748 pounds per harvested acre whiledryland yields averaged 263 pounds per acre in 2002.

      The748 irrigated yield figure marks the highest average irrigated yield in 25years and only the third time in that same time period that irrigated yieldshave eclipsed the 700 pound mark. Irrigated yields in 1993 averaged 716 poundsand were followed by a 706 pound irrigated average in 1994.

      Thefollowing table shows the official National Agricultural Statistics Serviceproduction figures for the 25-county Plains Cotton Growers, Inc. service area.

 

TexasHigh Plains

2002-cropUpland Cotton Production

Source: National Agricultural Statistics Service

 

Planted

Harvested

Yield/HA

Production

(480lb Bales)

Bailey

83,000

49,500

592

61,000

Borden

20,500

16,400

383

13,100

Briscoe

39,300

27,700

425

24,500

Castro

81,200

77,300

1,084

174,600

Cochran

131,500

95,500

596

118,500

Crosby

211,200

202,500

443

187,000

Dawson

293,000

216,500

421

190,000

Deaf Smith

54,300

30,100

850

53,300

Dickens

22,200

21,800

337

15,300

Floyd

175,800

118,000

548

134,600

Gaines

265,800

195,000

625

254,000

Garza

43,100

40,300

397

33,300

Hale

256,700

219,500

809

370,000

Hockley

251,200

225,000

487

228,300

Howard

130,400

77,300

310

50,000

Lamb

205,500

195,000

758

308,000

Lubbock

265,500

228,500

498

237,000

Lynn

292,000

277,000

338

195,100

Martin

156,500

61,600

312

40,000

Midland

32,000

13,800

330

9,500

Motley

24,700

23,500

249

12,200

Parmer

80,500

78,700

1,092

179,000

Swisher

84,200

70,400

708

103,800

Terry

252,900

186,000

430

166,500

Yoakum

129,200

79,000

529

87,000

 

3,582,200

2,825,900

551

3,245,600

 

Keep Failed Acreage Host Free

Friday,June 13, 2003             By Roger Haldenby

      PCGencourages producers to properly clean up any remaining cotton plants in fieldsbeing re-planted to another crop. This is particularly important to both thecontinued success of boll weevil eradication and to the pocket books of thosegrowers.

      Failedcotton acreage is normally eligible for a credit offsetting any boll weevilassessment that would otherwise be due as long as the acreage is kept free ofhostable cotton during the remainder of the growing season.

      However, ifhostable cotton is found in a failed cotton field after the certification date,the assessment could be re-applied if adequate measures are not taken by thegrower.

      Cooperationand consideration from all growers will help assure success in boll weevileradication and help avoid conflicts and misunderstandings over remaininghostable cotton later in the season.